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PRESENTED BY 

LILIAN CLARK HOOK KUHLKE 
and 
BEVERLY H. FRIERSON 






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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/muse1904sain 



Founded 1901 



Chartered 1904 



4 THE MUSE 



OF 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 



VOLUME VI. 
CLASS OF 1904 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE SENIOR CLASS 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 
1904 




31949 




BISHOP THEODORE DU BOSE BRATTON. 



RIGHT REVEREND T. D. BRATTON, D.D. 
Bishop of Mississippi, was born at Winnsboro, South Carolina, November 11, 1S62, and was graduated at 
the University of the South in the Theological Department in 1887, and received from that institution 
the degree of B.D. in 1889, and D.D. in 1901. He was ordained Deacon by the late Bishop Howe, of South 
Carolina, in 1887, and Priest by the same Bishop in the year following. He Mas engaged in work in South Carolina 
first as missionary at York, and then as rector of the Church of the Advent, Spartanburg, until 1899, when he 
became rector at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, North Carolina, which position lie held until his advancement to the 
episcopate. He was elected Bishop of Mississippi on Thursday, April 29, 1903, and was consecrated in St. Andrews' 
Church, Jackson, on St. Michael and All Angel's day in the same year. The candidate was presented by the 
Bishops of Georgia, Western Texas, and Alabama to the designated conseeratovs, the Bishops of Kentucky, Florida 
and North Carolina, while the Bishop of Tennessee was preacher. 

However deep may have been our grief at parting with him, we, at St. Mary's, have taken a loving pride in 
the elevation of Bishop Bratton to the highest office the Church has to bestow, and we count it among the good 
things of life that it was given to us to know him as he moved among us as man and rector. His magnetic per- 
sonality, his unswerving determination not to be ruled by prejudice, his never-failing tact, made him a head to be 
respected and loved ; his kindliness, tenderness and wisdom, a friend from whom to seek advice and sympathy ; 
the purity, charity and unselfishness of his character, a priest whose life is an incentive and inspiration to all who 
know him. To him we dedicate this book in loving gratitude for all he has done for us and for our Alma Mater. 



CALENDAR 1903-'04 

September 17 — Advent Term begins. March 27 — Palm Sunday; Bishop's visitation. 

November 1 — All Saints'; Founders' Day ; a holiday. April 1 — Good Friday; a holiday. 
November 2G — Thanksgiving Day ; a holiday. April :! — Easter Day. 

December 22 — Christmas holidays begins. May 12 — Ascension Day; a holiday. 

January 5 — Classes resumed at 8 : 45 a. m. May 22 — Commencement Sermon. 

January If — Lee's birthday ; half holiday. May 2-1 — Concert. 

January 2£ — Easter Term begins. May 24 — Class Day. 

February 17 — Ash Wednesday ; a holiday. May 2-1 — Meeting of the Alumna' Association. 

February 22 — Washington's birthday ; half holiday. May 25 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

May 26 — Graduation Exercises. 




<Jn e ^freetlna. 



hnid tin I 1, ■<■,■'. .i spi I q time. 

To the friendx it may claim, 

The Mow extends ids Ch ' ■ ■ 



s,,,,, 



LENDA] 



'■■... 









I ' ! ' : 

- 



■ ' I '''':■ 

" ia (1 '1 




r J he Greeting. 



Amid the blossoms of sprint/ time. 

To .the friends it may claim, 

Tlie Muse extends its Greeting. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. .1. B. Cheshire, D.D Raleigh, X. C. Rt. Key. Ellison Capers, D.I) Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. A. A. Watson, D.D Wilmington, K C. Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D. . . .Asheville, X. ('. 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D.D. Richard II. Battle, LL.D. \V. A. Erwin. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle. Dr. R. H. Lewis. Charles E. Johnson". 

Rev. M. M. Marshall, D.D. David Y. Cooper. 

EAST CAROLINA 

Rev. Robert Drake, D.D. Rev. T. M. ~N. George. Eraxk Wood. 

Colonel John W. Atkinson. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Rev. E. X. Joyner, R Ey . w. S. Holmes. H. P. Duval. 

John R. London. 
asheville 
Rev. T. C. Wetmore. Colonel T. F. Davidson. ( ). M. Royster. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D. 
Rev. F. .1. Murdoch, D.D. Charles E. Johnson. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

W. A. Etjwix. 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER 
Dr. K. P. Rattle. Jr. 




RENr [cN] ELY DO BOSE, 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



THE BISHOPS 

D.D Raleigh, N. C. ] is Cira D.D Columbia S. C. 

D.D Wilmington , C. Rt. Rj * h ic: \\. I - -.D.D ' SVC. 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 
NORTH CAEO] 

Kh-'li h ■■•■ [ ' 
■ : R. H. !.i ■• 



och D.D. 

. ■ : , ! '. > > 



IKK'I 1>R d] D.D 



1 



C. V IOB1 



''.'.:. 



W. A. Ebwix. 

v ii lbi.es E. Joussas. 
ra Y. Coop] ■ 



LIN 

■ 

I I 

iSHI 

EXECurn 

Rt, Rj : I 

■ 

■• 
Dr. 



i \ k Wood. 



H. P. Di vai.. 



O. M. Rovstek. 



! Ik. R. H. Lewis 




Our Rector, 
REVEREND McNEELY DU BOSE. 



Faculty and Officers 



Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. D Rector. Mrs. McNeely DuBose, .... School Mother. 

Miss Anne Saunders, Eector's Assistant. 

FACULTY 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. D., Ethics. 
Kate McKimmon, Writing. 

Elleneen E. Checkley, History. 

>Ernest Cruikshank, A.M. (Washington College, Md.), Latin and Science. 
William E. Stone, A.B. (Harvard), English and Philosophy. 

Eleanor W. Thomas, M.A. (Woman College, S. C), Literature 

Margaret M. Jones, Mathematics. 

Marie M. Gerber, French. 
i 

Frances E. Bell, Expression and Physical Culture. 

Christine Busbee, A. B. (University of Ninth Carolina), Greek »»</ German. 

Jennie B. Trapier, Assistant French. 

J Harriet E. Bowen, Preparatory Department. 



ART SCHOOL 
Clara I. Fenner (The .Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design.) 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

W. II. Sanborn, Director Ori/un awl Piano Theory. Chelian I'ixi.v, Piano. 

Martha A. Dowd, Piano. Mrs. W. II. Sanborn, Vocal. 

Genevieve E. Schutt, Piano. Gertrude Sanborn, Assistant Vocal. 

( 'harlotte K. Hull, Violin. 

COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 
Lizzie II. Lee, Principal. Juliet B. Sutton, Assistant. 

KINDERGARTEN 
Louise T. Busbee. 



Elleneen E. Checkley, Librarian. Lola E. Walton, Matron of Infirmary. 

Winnifred R. Massey, Assistant Librarian. Mrs. George W. Seat, Housekeeper. 



St. Mary's Alumnae 

ORGANIZED MAY, 1879 

Mns. Maiiv [bedell, President. Mrs. Besse Leak, First Vice-President. 

Mrs. It. S. Tucker, Second Vice-President. Hiss Kate Ik'Kiiuiox, Secretary and Treasurer. 




Senior Class 



Cornelia Coleman, President. Isabel Ashby Brumby, Treasurer. 

Margaret Gkay Stedmax, Vice-President. Eliza Richards Brown, Historian. 

Minnie G re enough Burgwyn, Secretary. Ann Kimberly Gifford, Prophet. 

Esther Barnwell Means, Poet. 

Motto: Yit;i vocat. Colors: Black and gold. 

Flower: Marechal Neil Rose. 



Mis Markarkt Morhecaj Jo . Oxford, North Carolina 



" Her eyi * wen , tin i B//t.\- of 



I ,'■'■, 4UKR. 








:N ■ Hit iif. ' 

i , , STED.M '.v, Vki-I'r n 
GrEI • . . . : ■ ' 

EsTHEF 



. ' DS BROV 

Iv 



Iea: 



l-OC!l1 



■ . .. I Ihi I li i ; 



V\ OV Kl 



Miss Margaret Mordecai .Tonus, . . Oxford, North Carolina 



•Her eyes were deeper than the depths of 
waters stilled at even." 



Our Honorary Member. 





Rosalie Bernhardt, V. B. 2. 



Salisbury, North Carolina. 



"Her manners an 1 so pleasing and kindly that 
site makes friends of all who come in contact 
with her." — Mark Twain. 



Rosalie, the Prairie Flower." 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

2. A. Literary Society. 
T. A. German Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Associate Senior. 

Corresponding Secretary of 2. A. '04. 

T. A. German Club. 

Altar Guild. 

Tennis Club. 

Basket Ball, Beta. 

Vice-President of St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 



fo i>m> Bow i ■':'!' lacl mi N T orth < 'avolina. 



/'< 



; ;'(; - JV/ HJ/4 ■;.■ 



Joseph" — "I seem U I - ; ' all, and long for ro^l. 



T A. Gei ii 
2. A. I.ii pk'i 
Seci'el 1 1 






F. A. < rcnn ii(.'! 

2 . A 

Sea elai ' - kelcli I ''lull 

Seen tar Si Rl ib Chapter. 

Tennis * lull 





I!. - 



ilina. 



, SO pi ■ ■ ''''"■ 

q/ ./// who come in ■ 



I lower. 



,71 NIOB YEAR. 

2. A. Litei «iet} 

■ i i 

- . . lior. 

'on 1 Secretary of -. A. ' 

Clul 
I 
Tenni Club 

t ] Beta 

: lizabeth's < ". 



y 



Josephine Bowejst, A. K. "9. . 



.Jackson, North Carolina. 



"Pretty enough — i-cri/ pretty." — Tennyson. 



"Joseph" — "I seem to he a little tired, that's all, and long for rest." 



JUKIOK YEAli. 

T A. German ( !hib. 

2. A. Literary Society. 
Secretary Sketching C'lnh. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

T. A. German ( 'lnh. 
2. A. Literary Society. 
Secretary Sketching' Chili. 
Secretary St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 
Tennis Club. 





Eliza Richards Browk Raleigh, North Caroli 



. 1 progeny of learning." — "The Rivals/ 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

2. A. Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Critic of 2. A. Society, '03. 

Class Historian. 

Assistant Editor on Advertisements of Muse. 



,! 



B. 



Marie! la, I eorgi 



'II, :■;,/ .■:.' i llegm </ •" the banks 

o h, i i Rivals 



/ 



•Bus\ bi 11, the Bun 



ii 

Treasurer of T. V ■ ■ n Club 

Vice-Pi esidem i ' - ' haptei - 

Critic of 2. A i '■■ iety '03. 

JVnnis ( 'Inli. 

U)| ; 

', I ...,-.. 

Busin - ■•: n igi 

Vice-] resident • m Club. 

Treasurer o i la ■ 
S. A. Editoi ii I 3( Mary's Peals. 

Baskel I ill B ream 

I C hib 

A [tar Gui Id. 




Ri 



. Kllll I . : 



ratjciiij . , • ■ "J'l, ' ■ ■ 





R 

■ 



1 



Isabel Asiiby Biu "mhy. r. B. 2. 



. Marietta, Georgia. 



"Head strong as mi allegory mi the banki 
of the Nile." — "The Rivals." 



"Busy bell, the Bumblebee." 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Treasurer of T. A. German Club. 
Vice-President St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 
Critic of 2. A. Literary Society '03. 
Tennis Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

President 2. A. Literary Societj'. 
Business Manager of Muse. 
Vice-President of T. A. German Club. 
Treasurer of Class '04. 
2. A. Editor-in-Chief of St. Mary's Peals. 
Basket Ball, Beta Team. 
Tennis Club. 
Altar Guild. 





Mixxie Gbeekough Bukgwyx, A. K. ~9. .Jackson, North Carolina. 



''Rare compound «/ oddity^ frolic and jun. 
II Jin relished a joke inn! rejoiced m n pun. — Goldsmith. 



Min. 



JU2JIOB YEAH. 

Vice-President 2. A. Literary Society 
L'Etoile German Glut. 
Dramatic ( Ink 
Tennis Club. 
Altar Guild. 

Sl:\ Kill YEAH. 

Treasurer of — A. Literary Society. 

President St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 

Dramatic Club. 

L'Etoile German ( Hub. 

Secretary of Class of '04. 

Assistant Business Manager of Muse. 

Tennis Club. 

Basket Ball. Beta. 

Altar Guild. 



Uoj 8lia Coles i I 



. V,r on. : : :oiffia. 



: ini) on •■in Hi. 



Fvate ( ! orny-Squn « 



Vice-Pr« A. II. 

Seeretan ■ th's '■ 'liapter. • 

i:im 

Altar Giiil< 
Tenni > Cli 
Captain of li i '1 

!•:. ,\ [] m.8 

Seen tai I . i ■ s Soi iel \ 

Tre; ■ man Chili 

;: .. i| lli-ta Te uu. 

Tenni 

Alta Gni) 

i , .. ... i 

K. A. I lidil il i om ; I tfai 

Literary I oi the Muse. 

Pvesidi ill n the < ilass. 





Alia Gki . ■ ■ . \. A. K. ¥. ..Jackson, Xorlh I 



/ , - cotitj I volte and fun, 

II ho , . : ... uid rcjoicd in a pu Gdldsi Hi 



Min 



JO" 10 J 

' H Pre -Him! i.. A. Lifer: n Societv 
man ( 'hili. 

: . Itip'('llll). 

I ■ Ink 

: Quilfl 

SE3JK 'B fEA] 

fr* asn rpr of — A. Literary So i 
iden St. Eli sabeth's < laaj 

' Mill. 

lei man I 'lull, 
ol i ' .- of '04. 

ii j ans sr o1 U 
Ti nni '< I •■ 

Beta 
' 



Cornelia Coleman, A. K. ¥ Macon, Georgia. 



"I tun afraid of nothing on earth. 



Kate Corny-Squaw." 



JUNIOR YEAH. 

President of the Class. 

Vice-President of the E. A. II. 

Secretary of St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 

L'Etoile German Chili. 

Altar Guild. 

Tennis Club. 

Captain of Beta Team. 

E. A. II. Marshal. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Secretary of E. A. II. Literary Society. 
Treasurer of L'Etoile German Club. 
Basket Ball, Captain of Beta Team. 
Tennis Club. 
Altar Guild. 
Inter-Society Debater. 
E. A. II. Editor of Peals from St. Mary' 
Literary Editor of the Muse. 
President of the Class. 





Virginia Albright Eldridge Raleiarh, North Carolina. 



I have scarce ever met with any one who knows more 
and says less." 



"Virgie." 



JUNIOR YEAE. 

2. A. Literary Society. 

SENIOR, YEAR. 

2. A. Literary Society. 



Al mo >.i;i 'i Elii i- ■■ ; ' ' ■■■■:■ Cai olina. 



; ... . , \ 



/tul t otmtenance. 



"Sunny. 1 



President of liaprer. 

E. A." II. Literal; 

Tan Delta Ge 

: Ls C] ub. 



. 3enioi 
Hi si ■ ' ' ' I • 

Secretai i of T. £ . lufo. 

rice-Pi iflnii • itlx-i i Ihapter. 

['euni ■ 

! I 11 Guild 
[nter-Soeieti 





I 



: 



' 



I hat nay on . 





s 

iti rai 5 3i 

roii 



Margaret Elmer George, r. B. 2 . . . . JNTev- Bern, jSTortli Carolina. 



r A merry heart mal'etJi a cheerful countenance. 



"Sunny/ 



JUNIOR yeak. 

President of St. Etheldreda's Chapter. 
E. A. II. Literary Society. 
Tan Delta German Club. 
Tennis Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Associate Senior. 

Historian of E. A. II., '04. 

Secretary of T. A. German Club. 

Vice-President of St. Catherine's Chapter. 

Tennis Club. 

Basket Ball, Alpha Team. 

Altar Guild. 

Inter-Society Debater. 





A xx KniisEiiLY Giffokd, 1> . A. National Soldiers' Home, Virgi 



'] leave thy praises unexpressed." — Virginia. 



.TUXIOR TEAK. 

Secretary of E. A. II. Literary Society, '02. 
Critic of E. A. II. Literary Society, '03. 
Secretary and Treasurer of Dramatic Club. 
Treasurer of L'Etoile German Club. 
Historian of Class '04. 
Inter-Society Debater. 
Tennis Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Basket Ball, Alpha. 

Altar Guild. 

E. A. II. Editor-in-Chief of " St. Mary's Peals. : 

Secretary of L'Etoile German Club. 

Treasurer of Basket Ball Association. 

Tennis Club. 

Dramatic Club. 

Prophet of Class. 

President of E. A. II. Literary Society. 

Editor-in-Chief of Muse. 



1 • i Watson Ghei . 



RaL ieh. Sortli C c ilina. 



I ;d/ bf«w< i urs lit • \ lingl hair." — Pope. 



ion vi Lit, 
K. A par 

- ,■ [(>] s 

E. A. II. 1 







ation; 







| . j . . ... ,< : 





F.iUi. 


Si 


. ; 1 Literal 5 i 




i. Literari 


■ 


.:'.■:,..: mafic < !lnb. 


! 1 ■■ 


oil Gei me . ■ " il 


u 


-i-- '04. 




ati 




.... 
Ins] 

lit. , ill 

., . ■ .,, lc i term in I Kib. - 



i . 

A. I !. Literan Si i 
Kilittn -in-< 'bief of S 



Daisy Watson Greek Ealeieh, North Carolina. 



Pig." 



"Fair tresses man's imperial race ensnare, 
And beauty draws in with a single hair." — Pope. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

E. A. II. Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

E. A. II. Literary Society. 





Margaret Hkrbert 



. Buck Roe Beach, Virginia. 



".I girl of few wovds, who spends half her 
time minding her on business and the other half 
in letting other people's alum.' 



''Pe°' n 'v. : 



SENIOR YEAR. 

E. A. n. Literary Society. 

L'Etoile German Club. 

Secretary and Treasurer of St. Margaret's Chapter. 

Captain Senior Tennis Club. 
Basket Ball, Alpha. 



Marjorie Hughson, A Orange, ?few fersi 



/".';- re's a ■ ! here's a man of pluck! 

. I man irlw frf d ,.■ /,- is say, 

7 houfllt a wholi i .■' ; , -i him . " 



'ilidge.' 



2. A. Literan v 

Altar Guild. 

'I pnnis CI ii ; 

Preasurer of St \\ < hapter. 

_ 
i A. Literan oeiet i 
ir Guild. 

< 'luh. 
' " ■ President of St. Monica's Chapter. 
Assistant Literary Editor of Muse. 
Inter-Socieh 1 )< hater. 




■','.: " | R| 



' 



I ." I .; I .". ; -. who •■," 

I, II 1)11X1 
CD I . 







E. A . II . Li 

i 

■■..,. ■ , . 

• niiis ( ' I n 1 > . ■ 



Marjorie Hughson, V. A Oranse, New Jevse 



'There's a brace fellow! There's a man of pluck! 
A man who's mil afraid to nay liis mi/, 
Thoiujh a whole linen's against him." 



'Mid; 



JUNIOR YEAR, 

2. A. Literary Society. 

Altar Guild. 

Tennis Chili. 

Treasurer of St. Monica's Chapter. 

SEHTOB YEAR. 

2. A. Literary Soeiet}'. 

Altar Guild. 

Tennis Club. 

Vice-President of St. Monica's Chapter. 

Assistant Literary Editor of Muse. 

Inter-Society 1 )ebater. 





Susie Franks Iden .... 



. Raleisrk, North Carolina. 



"Silence is wisdom, I am silent then. 



"If silence were golden, thou shouldst be a millionaire." 



; liKTII Wj i.m 



i 



Raleigh, North I !'ai olimi 



'■ Vorfs an ; at • ealh< d smiles. 






I] ."MAR. 

2. A Literal Sociel i . 

2. A. [,ii.i '- ii , 




i V\: ■ 



Ra 






... 




: ■ 



Elizabeth: Willins Massey Raleigh, North Carolina. 



'Nods and becks and wreathed smiles: 



" Bessie." 



JUNIOR YEAE. 

2. A. Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAE. 

2. A. Literary Society. 





Esther Barnwell Means. A. K. ^ . .Charleston, Smith Carolina. 



"Remain in yon isolation. 
So mniri/ worlds, so much to do, 
So htflr done' 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

L'Etoile German < 'lull. 
Secretary St. ( 'atherine's Chapter. 
Altar Guild. 
Tennis Chili. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Treasurer St. Catherine's Chapter. 
Altar Guild. 
Secretary Tennis Club. 
Poet of Class '04. 



Mai.'\ Lei Mi int 



■ 



Carolin: 



cling. 



■ • i 

2. \ ! ■: 



\ . ,. : 

2. A. .:■. 





Bai I bans, A. K. ■"?... Charlestoi arol 



'solution, 
uuinj u ■ '■" .-I' m [i li hi 
U ■■ i, , . " 



• ■ i nan I 'hib. 

St. t 'a then ae haptei 
thin 



i- con n 

■■■ St. ( 'atheviiK ' hapn 
nild 

IVnnis Club. 
04. 



Mary Lee Montague Raleigh. North Carolina. 



''Song is the tone of feeling: 



"May." 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

2. A. Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAR.. 

Associate Senior. 

2. A. Literary Society. 





(aerie Helen Moore, A. K."9 Littleton, North Carolina. 



"It's guid to be honest and true." — Robert Burns. 



Ca Helen." 



JUNIOR. YEAR. 

Corresponding Secretary E. A. II. Literary Society. 

L'Etoile German Club. 

Altar Guild. 

Tennis Club. 

Treasurer St. Ethelreda's Chapter. 

SENIOR TEAR. 

Corresponding Secretary E. A. II. Literary Society. 
L'Etoile German Club. 
President Altar Guild. 
Basket Ball, Beta. 
Tenuis Club. 



Lucy T-> nx>R ] n '<■ X T. 



i lie illc Sorth ' arolina 



' ' /':*■ d< atli to n I i a ' 

/7. and desir* all good men's love." — S'i 



'Loll ." 



{IOH '■ 

Convspoiiding ■• of 2. A. I iterary Society, '02. 

\ iei Presidi Lit i : I ■ '04. 

] n asnrei of A [tar ' I iiild. 

Treasurer of St. l i lie ine's Cli 

Secretary of L'Etoi i i nan ( -lnb. 

( 'aptain of Alpha I earn. 

Tennis ( Ink 

ENIOfi YEAR. 

Presidi nf of Tennis ; ink 

Secretary 2. A. Liti par ly. 

Secretary of Basket Ball Association, Befc 
i ,' <i> n' of L'Etoile German Club. 
S . ' atherhi '- ' liapti r. 
2. A lito ■ I'Si. Man s Pi 

.'- ments of Muse. 





("arijie "iii A. K.M' Littleton 



■ 






and tn '—} ■ ' ■ 



: OH I 1-AK. 

( ■ ereti ry E. A. IJ 

an : 'i 

! 

Trey -.in 

BNIOH BAB 

.. >■ .. Secrelni I ' ' tcvni 

; Gi-rn an : lull 
Guild 
Beta 
| ' i , lu I 



Lucy Taylor Redwood, A. K. ¥. 



. Asheville, North Carolina. 



' 'Tis death to me ti> he at enmity; 
I hate it, and desire nil good men's lore." — Shakespeare. 



"Lou." 



JUNIOR Y'EAR. 

Corresponding Secretary of 2. A. Literary Society, '02. 

Vice-President of Class '04. 

Treasurer of Altar Guild. 

Treasurer of St. Catherine's Chapter. 

Secretary of L'Etoile German Club. 

Captain of Alpha Team. 

Tennis Club. 

SENIOR Y'EAR. 

President of Tennis Club. 

Secretary 2. A. Literary Society. 

Secretary of Basket Ball Association, Beta. 

Yiee President of L'Etoile German Club. 

Secretary of St. Catherine's Chapter. 

2. A. Editor of St. Mary's Peals. 

Editor on Advertisements of Muse. 

MrsE-o 





Elizabeth Piedmont Ski 



.Kaleigh, North Carolina. 



•Lillian.' 



'Wearing all thai ireiglit 
Of learning like a power.' 



JUXIOB YEAH. 

2. A. Literary Society. 
Class Poet. 

SEXIOR TEAE. 

5. A. Literary Society. 



Makgaket Gray Stemmji Winston, North Carolina. 



"Music i ' • 

I 'tin at s in •■■ Shelley. 



I 



•esidi ill of L'Etoil * 
Secretai'ii of the ( !)ac 
2. A. Literal j -'■< n i I 
Altar Guild 

Captain Ball I I I\ i i 
1 ' i • 1 1 1 1 i -. ( 'lull. 

i 

ident i if L'Etoile < ri m n I hil 

!orr< p ! ; Se i-etarj i ; ' I ! Liti arj Society, '03. 
Critic <ii 2. A. Lii i 

U1 ■■■ Id 
Vice- Pn ideri oJ ! '' lis Club. 

■ President of ( li - 

■ idenl ■■■ : '. ■ I ! . -■■ elation 
ieta Ti 





Er.i7.AREj - Ralciffh. No 



; il 



... :, 



. Ait. 

:■_ V. Li rarv 



Margaret Gray Stedman, A. K. ^. . . .Winston, North Carolina. 



'Music, when, soft voices die, 
Vibrates in the memory." — Shelley. 



"Mae;." 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

President of L'Etoile German Club. 

Secretary of the Class. 

2. A. Literary Society. 

Altar Guild. 

Captain Ball, Beta Team. 

Tennis Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

President of L'Etoile German Club. 
Corresponding Secretary of 2. A. Literary Society, '03. 
Critic of 2. A. Literary Society, '04. 
Altar Guild. 

Vice-President of Tennis Club. 
Vice-President of Class. 
President of Basket Ball Association. 
Beta Team. 





Maht Sumteb Thomas, $■ A. 



.Columbia, Sontli Carolina. 



"Sunm." 



"There's many n black, black eye fltey say. 
But none so bright as mine." 



.Tl'XIOl; YEAR. 

L'Etoile German ( Hub. 

Treasurer of E. A. II. Literary Society. 

Tennis ( Hub. 

Dramatic ( Hub. 

SENTOB YEAH. 

Associate Senior. 

Leader L'Etoile German Club. 

Treasurer of E. A. II. Literary Society. 

Vice-President of St. Etbeldreda's Chapter. 

Vice-President Dramatic Club. 

Secretary Alpha Basket Ball Team. 

Altar Guild. 



Senior History 



Misses 



i .. lilt 1 


V v i 1 


Giffoi 1 


Massey, 


Redwooi 


IV'.. '| 


ill 


Green, 


Means. 


Skinner, 


i 1 1 ' 


' 


Herbert, 


Montague, 


Stodmai 


Brumh 


1 


Hughson 


Moore, 


Thomas 



len 



The class roll of nin i i-h and four has bee ed for the last tiim and the Seniors have lefl the 

class room forever. Tin ^i uti 'school life is ovei and we stand at the cross-roads looking bad 

.,,,,.,!,, past years with heari l-i ing remembrance arid gazing towards the future with varied 1 s and 

g ars Four years ago inn < ive came hither. Homesick, yel determined, we knocked at the door ol 

j Gary's and begged lea^ I '1 ivliioh had sheltered our mothers and friends before us. Having 

classified we at once entered | ny duties of school life. That first year was a terrible one, How.-wi Id 

0Ul . ,.,„.., alK | troubles to i tenor, and they were no joke either Not Catiline liimseli trembled 

more at the thunders oi C \ : r Freshmen. Then we grumbled so over ■' Genung" exercises thai 

it has been only recently tin ther innocent 1 k has been at all dissipated. But with all these dray, 

backs wi push* ' forward - cxempl IV ur examini i we wen ready to begin vort i 

fall , ■ :.■ id m a md one ■ h.w we racked our brains for ideas t I ' se daily themes. B 

on the other! m how moothl; . i tin i ite passage >l i uul how . isih we solved all our 

rinals unl ea< h of u i ■' 'bo ■ • ^■ u '^ , possiblj feel 

By the time we were Junioi ' ia< iwd the reputation of being conceited li yen, thinking our cli 

,.,. an 'd ;il ti r-spirif ol iti age-" This may have been tro irtain extent foi i fell we had jusl 

, Lyear, howe\ ngled joy and sorrow, while our brains a li heavily taxed, our h 

ifflicted, foi we learned, with the most sii gret that we must gi< i u - <u ' beloved rector. H 

, ... to another field of v i nd fell h his dut; I pond 




Mary Si.'.mtj "'' i (.'oil 



■ go h\ tr/Jlt i 



IU.VTi in VI-: 1R. 

i I kib, 

A. 0. l.ii rai • iety 
I'Vimi ' ': 

'; ■ ila 111) 

SEN [< in ' I \\i, 

. - iciiite Si nior, 
Li ifli ' !.' I- ru'li Gi ['mail I kill 

Creasurer o A. .IT. Life iety. 

Cresidenl if S Etheklrerla 

■p-Pri - nt Di inn I i< I Inh. 

'Hvn ,ii-- \ir : laskol : tall roam. 



Senior History 



Massey, 


Redwood 


Menus. 


Skinner, 


Montague, 


Stedmau, 


Moore, 


Thomas. 



Misses Bernhardt, Burgwyn, Gifford, 

Bowen, Coleman, Green, 

Brown, Eldridge, Herbert, 

Brumby, George, Hughsou, 

Iden, 
The class roll of nineteen hundred and four has been called for the last time and the Seniors have left the 
class room forever. The quiet peaceful routine of school life is over and we stand at the cross-roads looking back 
over the past years with hearts full of loving remembrance and gazing towards the future with varied hopes and 
fears. Four years ago from many places we came hither. Homesick, yet determined, we knocked at the door of 
St. Mary's and begged leave to enter the school which had sheltered our mothers and friends before us. Having been 
classified we at once entered upon the many duties of school life. That first year was a terrible one. How we told 
our woes and troubles to every sympathetic listener, and they were no joke either. Not Catiline himself trembled 
more at the thunders of Cicero than did we poor Freshmen. Then we grumbled so over " Genung" exercises that 
it has been only recently that fear of that rather innocent book has been at all dissipated. But with all these draw- 
backs we pushed forward and most of us being exempt from our examinations, we were ready to begin work in the 
fall of nineteen and one, as full-fledged. How we racked our brains for ideas to put into those daily themes. But, 
on the other hand, how smoothly we sailed over the intricate passages of Virgil and how easily we solved all our 
originals until each of us felt as wise as Sophomores could possibly feel. 

By the time we were Juniors we had gained the reputation of being conceited and of even thinking our class 
"the choice and master-spirit of its age-" This may have been true to a certain extent for we felt we had just cause 
to be so. It was a year, however, of mingled joy and sorrow, while our brains were less heavily taxed, our hearts 
were deeply afflicted, for we learned, with the most sincere regret that we must give up our beloved rector. He had 
been called to another field of work and felt it his duty to respond. 



Then we came back for our Senior year; of course we ever missed Dr. Bratton, but we daily grew fonder of 
his successor, as he, with his quiet dignity, worked with us, showing the great interest and love he entertained for 
St. Mary's and all connected with it. 

Those were busy days, it is true, but there was always a time for hearty fun and amusement. It is a boast of 
ours that none of our predecessors were privileged to enjoy so many "At Homes," Dinings, "Library Parties," and 
even "Evening Parties." Some few of us had entered as young, simple "Preps" who were considered fit subjects 
for practical, humiliating jokes, and during the years our class was added to and taken from until only fifteen regu- 
lars remained, one of these having joined us in our Senior year. 

And now our happy school days are over, although wo looked forward with joyful anticipation to the time of 
our graduation. After all we arc not so glad to leave dear St. Mary's which seems like a second home to us. 

In conclusion let us hope that the bonds of friendship formed during the time of our probation may be strong 
and enduring, for while we were together we endeavored with earnest prayer and patient toil to gain that knowledge 
'which alone can make us ready to meet the obligations embodied in our motto — " Vita Voeat." 









Class Prophecy 



The rain and the sleet were heating against the window 
panes, the wind was moaning around the corners of the 
house and shrieking down the chimney, and it was Hal- 
lowe'en — the very night for witches, ghosts, and all the 
other inhabitants of graveyards to be abroad. I sat shiv- 
ering over the large fire, my open book neglected on my 
lap, and my thoughts busy with my school days at St. 
Mary's. 

" I wonder what has become of the girls of '04 ? " I 
mused. " If I could only see them all to-night ! " 

" You may if you like," said a voice at my elbow ; 
" that is, to a certain extent." I turned with a start and 
saw standing beside me a tall, white figure — a real ghost. 



" Will you come with me ? " it asked. 

My curiosity was stronger than my fear, so after a lit- 
tle hesitation I said yes. Putting on my wraps, as the 
Figure bade me, I followed it out into the stormy night. 
We walked for hours ; neither of us spoke ; and several 
times I was on the point of turning back. But at last, 
about day-break, we came to a high walled enclosure. My 
guide unlocked the huge iron doors and to my horror 
silently ushered me into a graveyard. In the cold gray 
light of the dawn the tombstones had a most ghastly effect. 

" Ah-h! so some of us are dead!" I murmured. ' 

" Here," said the Figure, pointing to a grave near her. 

1 bent sii as to see the inscription, and read — 



( '. ( 'iii.kmax, " Even so," said my guide, "and a tragic end, too. She 

drowned '''''' '" r '"' ' 11 "' 1 ' ( * sr 0I science — she was blown np doing a 

chemistry experiment." 

" Drowned! oh, horrible!" I cried. ■' She was alwavs fond of chemistry," I observed with 

" Yes," said my guide. " Tier's was a sad death. She £ ]j n0 . 

went abroad and had carls, dukes and princes at her feet, Repassed on. 

but .me unlucky day she went fishing on one of the lakes ^ ^ tombgtone j S;|W ,,.„, ,,„ ft _ 

and was drowned — without catching any fish, too, except 

,£!.,) 1 Iaisy Greene, 
one — a cat-fish. 

1 saw thai my guide was weeping, so 1 hurried on. appendicitis. 

■' What's this?" I exclaimed, stopping at another grave. While 1 paused to shed a tear, my guide explained. 

'" Eliza Brown ! " " Her malady had a Latin name. It was a great satis- 

•" Yes," was the sorrowful answer. " You see that it faction to her." 

was too great a strain fur her to remember all she knew, " Minnie Burgwyn," 1 read. " Is she gone, too? AI- 

or to know all she could remember — either way you ways so bright and jolly — ah, me!" 

waul to put it — so she gave it up, poor girl!" With "After she left school," said the Figure, "she was a 

sighs and tears we passed on. busy woman. Every club and organization in the United 

" Elizabeth Massey," I read next. " Tell me what States wanted her for Treasurer. Soon her fame spread 

happened to her." to Europe. She died of overwork." 

" She died of an acute attack of hysteria," answered the With tears running down my cheeks, I pushed forward. 

Figure. " She got to laughing and couldn't stop." " We are coming to the two geniuses of your class," 

" This is too sad! " 1 moaned. "Arc there any more?" explained my guide, gently laying two laurel wreathes on 

"A few. Come," said the Figure. the graves at our feet. 

" Lucy." 1 read. "Ah- not Lucy Redwood ? " I looked and read — 



Esther Means, the Poet. " Margaret Herbert! — so young and so bright," I 

■vr TT sighed. "Is her death a mvsterv, too?" 

M. tiUGJISON. ,,, .. , .,,',• , ., , 01 

Nie died very quietly, answered niv guide. one 

" Yes," I sighed, " they were exceedingly clever, even at never ment i one( ] j t to a s ,,„|." 

scllooL " ■' What's this? " I asked. " Mrs. , who? " 

"Lily Skinner," I read. "What killed her?" .. sh( , w . ls Margaret Stedmui. Soon after she left St. 

"Too much society," said my guide. "She made her Mary » a slu , ulalT i ec | a ve ry nice young Doctor, and had 

debut in Raleigh, and the social whirl she was plunged t]|( , happiest kind , lf marri ecl life." 

int.. brought on nervous prostration. Oh! these society « j alway8 thought she'd be a gre-it singer," I reflected. 

belles!" "Isabel Brumby! What ?" I began. 

The next tombstone was queer—very white, with odd- « slle , lie(] ,, f exhaustion over the ' Muse.' It was the 

looking black leters on it: saddest ease," explained the Fipure, as we approached the 

\t cv T ,„ „ last grave, on which I read — 

]j A 0. 2 ' AKI ' I|: Hei.es 

"What is this?" I asked. " Virgie Eldridge— but rs xo Moore. 

what's the rest of it ? " "A pun," I murmured, "is the lowest — " but tears 

" It is in black and white before you," said the Figure, cheeked my further utterance. "And so," I mused, " they 

" I can't say any more." I did my best to guess, but in are all dead ; oh ! the pity of it." 

vain. "Yes," said the Figure softly; "but after all, you 

" Come," said the Figure, " it's getting late." know, the Class of '04 was too good for this earth ! " 



Class Poem 



Life calls! and the voice of its calling 
Is ringing o'er land and o'er sea — 

With its echoes of striving and toiling 
li is speaking to you and to me. 

While the unshadowed sky of youth's morning 
Spreads over us, bright with youth's sun. 

We are stirred by a soul vision dawning 
( It' a race and a goal to be won. 

At noon, when Life's billows are surging 
With the rush and the roar of the strife. 

In iiuc voice the earth sounds will lie merging, 
The voice of the calling of Life ! 

And at last when Life's shadows are falling. 
And we rest — and the battle is o'er, 

Triumphant still comes Life's clear calling, 
For the Life that is Life lies before. 



Toast* 



To l he class we love ! to the end of our striving, 

Through the years we have worked for her more and more, 

Let us now at the goal of hopes arriving 

Cry, " Heres to the Class of haughty-four! " 

In the year to eome will no one regret us ? 

Will no trace of our memory yet survive '( 
To the reason that every one must forget us — 

-A health to the Class of Naughty-five! " 

As lower, lower the lights are burning, 

As swifter, swifter the moments pass. 
Let us give a toast when our hearts are yearning, 

Let us drink to St. Mary's and break the alass ! 



Class March with 



With head brim full of classic Lore, 
facts and fancies running o'er. 



What living: creature could know more 
Than the sweet 'Girl Grad ' of nauirht.v four. 











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JUNIOR CLASS. 



Junior Class 

Motto: Fac et spi Flower: Red Rose. 

Colors : Maroon and grey. 

iabet Rosai.ik 1 h •)-'■ ft, Pre 

Saj»ie Marcem ■< muns, Vice-President. 

\l)\\ Hott Clark, Secretary. 



Jeas Moore Carson, Treasurer. 

Axna' Barrow Clark,' Historian. 



Olila Brown. 
Jearj Carson. 
Anna Clark. 
Rena Clark. 
Mary Dis 
Margaret DuBose. 



Ida Evan?. 
Effie Fairley. 
Kllcn Gibson. 

Elsie Gudger. 



Dorothy Hughson. 
Sadie Jenkins 
Bessie Poe Law. 
Mi issie Long. 
Mamie Rossell. 



Isabel Tin tf. 

Margi ■" ti ■ prings. 
Rosa Thomas. 
Linda Tillinghast. 

' . . I • i iVee] 























*9P^\ 




















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S ft 1 










■;■>'•■ 






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Motto : Fac et spera. 



Junior Class 



Colors : Maroon and grey. 



Flower : Red Rose. 



Margaret Rosalie DuBose, President 

Sadie Mabcelline Jenkins, Vice-President. 

Rena Hoyt Clark, Secretary. 

Jean Moore Carson, Treasurer. 

Anna Barrow Clark, Historian. 



Ohla Brown. 
Jean Carson. 
Anna Clark. 
Rena Clark. 
Mary Dixon. 
Margaret DuBose. 



Ida Evans. 
Effie Fairley. 
Ellen Gibson. 
Florence Grant. 
Elsie Gndger. 



Dorothy Hughson. 
Sadie Jenkins. 
Bessie Poe Law. 
Mossie Long. 
Mamie Rossell. 



Isabel Ruff. 
Marguerite Springs 
Rosa Thomas. 
Linda Tillinghast. 
Fvelvn Weeks. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Sophomore Class. 



Flower; Pansy. 
Motto: Milil Colors: Dark blue and old gol 



Ann if. Gr.vs N 



OFFICERS 

rchisott, Vice-President 

Nannie E. Smith, Secretary. 

\m V FlTZ Si mi I vs. / n " U) • 



ROLL 



Josephine Boylan. 
Susan Bynum. 
; [eli n i rensbaw, 
Myrtle Disoswaj 
Amy Fitz-Simon? 
atherim P ter 
Nellie Fr,o 

! .. : ' ' . [ther. 
Emily Rfiggs 



1 1 olmes. 
M. Si u hi Jones. 

nnii ' amb 

■ .1 ' 

vell'l - 
Lily Lynah. 
[la i ie1 Meares. 
Olive Morjill. 
Ji imie A. Murehi 



Annie Gray Nnsh. 
( 'hristine Riehai d 
Mary Leigb Rol asoti 
Florence RufF. 
Henrietta RufF. 
Janet Sladi . 
Kate Sladi 
Annie Sloan. 
Margaret Smith. 



NTamiic K. Si itli 
Alice VV. Spruill. 
i ue\ Sweet. 
I (orothy Slocum. 
E [izabetli Temple. 
i nbel 'I'h 
A nfrusta \\ 
Kate Winslov , 
: 'i : ii es Woolf. 



Sophomore Class. 



Flower : Pansy. 
Motto: Milites bonam militam. Colors: Dark blue and old gold. 

OFFICERS 

Annuo Gray Nash, President. 

Jk.nnie A. Mtjrchison, Vice-President. 

Nannie E. Smith, Secretary. 

Amy Fitz Simons, Treasurer. 



ROLL 



Josephine Boy Ian. 
Susan Bymim. 
Helen Crenshaw. 
Myrtle Disosway. 
Amy Fitz-Simons. 
( 'atherine Foster. 
Nellie Frost. 
Elizabeth Gaither. 



Georgette Holmes. 
M. Stuart Jones. 
Annie Lamb. 
Mary Lassiter. 
Nell Lewis. 
Lily Lynah. 
Harriet Meares. 
Olive Morrill. 
Jennie A. Murchison. 



Annie Gray Nash. 
Christine Richards. 
Mary Leigh Robinson. 
Florence Ruff. 
Henrietta Ruff. 
Janet Slade. 
Kate Slade. 
Annie Sloan. 
Margaret Smith. 



Nannie E. Smith. 
Alice W. Spruill. 
Lucy Sweet. 
Dorothy Slocum. 
Elizabeth Temple. 
Isabel Turpin. 
Auflmsta Watts. 
Kate Winslow. 
Frances Woolf. 




FRESHMAN CLASS. 




Freshman Roll 



; em Daisy 



('< ss: i plhnv and Wiiiti 



Senaii ( 'lilTZ, J'i ■ 

J| ,: , : ! oxsou, ' a e-F 'resident. 

Gijai ; \Vn iTAKi-ai, lecretarit 
Exrn.\ rlonci 



• , Serena. 

Greti 
o Bland 
Carrison, Emilv. 



Davis, Ells 

ebronk, Vir 
Jones, Sarah. 
Horner, Kate. 



[Iaywoorl, Lucy. 
Hill. Frances. 
Norfleel Annie. 

m , Lilly. 



Slur >mb, Mary Urn- I il 
Sullivan, Gi rl i ude. 
irite. 

il I ■ i ; a i ' 




■■..'/. N 




Freshman Roll 



Flower: Daisy. 



Coxoks: Yellow and White. 



Sexaii Oritz, President. 

Margaret Con nor, Vice-President. 

Grace Wihtakkk, Secretary. 

Emit.y Hodges, Treasurer. 



Bailey, Serena. 
Barnes, Gretchen. 
Bowen, Bland. 
Garrison, Eniilv. 



Davis, Ella. 
Glazebrook, Virgilia. 
Jones, Sarah. 
Horner, Kate. 



Haywood, Lncy. 
Mill, Frances. 
Xorfleet, Annie. 
Savage, Lilly. 



Sloe )mb, Mary Hinsdale. 
Sullivan, Gertrude. 
Short, Marguerite. 
Yillepigue, Mary. 



Business Department 



B rnard 

r I 
lien : lorti ' 
'.in ie ! !ii'"iii. 
^\l ililved Edri ; 
I miise Evan . 
Sophie ' J rimes. 
Lillian Haigh. 
Mat tie Jones. 



Daisy King. 
Lil lie Long. 
Lucy Miller. 
Hallie Robei tson. 

Katie Smi b 
Mary Sturj 
Lucy Tayloe 
Mary Thomps 
Plaeide I ndei ■ 
Leize \V mi i i 



Business Department 



Marv Andrews. 
Xelle Bernard. 
Ella Davis. 
Myrtle Disosway. 
Ellen Dortch. 
Annie Du<'hi. 
Mildred Edmunds. 
I onise Evans. 
Sophie Grimes. 
Lillian Haigh. 
Mattie Jones. 



I)ais>' King. 
Li Hie Long. 
Lucy Miller. 
Ilallie Robertson. 
Katie Smith. 
Mary Sturgeon. 
Lucy Tayloe. 
Mary Thompson. 
Plaeide Underwood, 
Leize Weaver. 



PEALS FROM ST. MARY'S. 



RALEIGH, N. C. THANKSGIVING NUMBER. NOVEMBER 22. 



THE GREAT STATE FAIR. 



THE FATE OF 1903. 

Of course, as is always the case, it was 
predicted that the Fair of 1903 would be 
a great success, and truly it was if we 
judge from the number of people that at- 
tended it. The managers promised to do 
their part if the weather-man would do 
his, so with these two forces working 
harmoniously together, what could have 
been expected but a week of pure fun? 

At the time appointed, interesting- 
looking fakirs with their more interest- 
ing paraphernalia began to arrive, while 
car-loads of goods for the different ex 
hibits were being shipped daily. By 
Tuesday all was in readiness and the 
grounds which for a year had appeared 
lonesome and desolate became the scene 
of great activity. 

An entrance into Floral Hall was ef- 
fected with difficulty because of the 
crowd, but the sights within fully recom- 
pensed for the shoviDg and crowding and 
pushing. The exhibits were artistically 
decorated and displayed, every variety 
from the pumpkins and the patch-work 

56 



quilts to the automobiles and the latest 
farming implements. What crowds lin- 
gered around the lunch-counters, what 
appetites the hungry pleasure-seekers 
had! 

And then the Midway! Surely this 
was the crowning glory of it all. Here 
were all kinds of shows and people. The 
Crystal Maze, the House Upside-Down, 
the Animal Shows, Lunette the Flying 
Lady, the Ferris Wheels, the Merry-go 
'rounds — all were in evidence ami 
raked in the dimes to the tur* 
watha." There were the 
raphers. who implore" 
ant." the man V 
"double-rubb' 
firming that 

maids an<' 

who was 
essary e 
whistle 

Ob' 
otl 



TOPICS OF INTEREST. 

On Monday evening. October the 
nineteenth, Shakespeare's great play 
"Twelftn Night," was presented at ' 
Academy of Music, by Miss Marie T 
right, very ably assisted by her r 
A large number of St. Mary' 
tended. 

"When Johnny Comes p 
one of the greatest 
season, appearp' 1 
clay, Noveir 1 
Mary's rT ' 

'•Ti- 
lr - 



EDITORS-IN-CHIEF: 

S. A. E. A. n. 

ISABEL ASHBY BRUMBY. ANN KIMBERLY GIFFORD. 



EDITORS: 
LUCY TAYLOR REDWOOD. CORNELIA COLEMAN. 

MARGARET ROSALIE DuBOSE. RENA HOYT CLARK. 




,-'"■■'■ 




Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 



otto : Where high thoughts are duty. 
Flower : Wild Rose. 
Colors : Old Rose and Sage. 




THE E. A. II. LITERARY SOCIETY. 



Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 



Ailvchi Term. 
Ann Kimberly Gii ''■■ 

; i • II WEAVE*, 
. ORNELIA ( loLEMAN, 

m'.ii: Helen Mooh is, 

Mar Thom 

E\ ii. v\ Weeks, 

. LARK 

Mins Hampton, . 
( ilifwrd ii kyward 

! . i.'i: m Barnes. 
I Leloi ■ i lei he. 
I.'i ;i;i Clarl 
Cornelia ' leman. 
Ellen I ; n-ti 
iet George. 

ifford. 
■ v Green. 



• 



OFFICERS 

President _ . 
I 'ice-President 
Secretary 
esponding Secretary 
Treasurer 

Critic 

Historian 

Teller 

T, tier 



ROLL 



[Irtl pton 
irel He 'bei 

I I : . ward. 

JoL son 
aVi 



' 



Aletliea Md ri ■■■ 
Cai i'ii Moor 
Annie < ■. X a b. 
I 'hrii tine Ki m 
Isabel Ruff. 
Kati 31a 
• I a net Sla le 
lie Sloa 
Mart 



\l i-s Kate MeKiimji m 
Diss Lei 
VJ.ll Gi rber. 

\\ • Hull. 



!i iNORARY MEMBERS 
Bishop T. D. Bratton. 



i I i , in 
Ann Kimberly Giffokd 
Rena Clark. 

■ I OLEMAN. 

Carrie Helen Moore. 
Mary Sumter Thomas. 
Evelyn Weeks. 
Margaret Elmer George. 

Minna HAMPTON. 

1 II] PFORTJ H KYWARD. 

\l a n Si urgeon. 
: ■ ! i Sullivan. 

El i/.iil h 1 ei iple. 
IVIer 
. i ■ In bias. 
i/.l i 1 avei 

I . 



: - Si : ' 
I , ■ : p 



a pupi : ligil to this Soc s neces o make an average of 90 p 



it) I i stu 

59 




: HE V .. RA1 



Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 



Advent Term. 
Ann Kimeerly Gifford, 
Leize Weaver, 
Cornelia Coleman, 
Carrie Helen Moore, 
Mary Sumter Thomas, . 
Evelyn Weeks, 
Rena Clark, 
Minna Hampton, . 
Clifford Heyward, 

Gretchen Barnes, 
lleloise Beebe. 
Rena Clark. 
Cornelia Coleman. 
Ellen Dorteh. 
Elmer George. 
Ann Gilford. 
1 (aisy Green. 



Cor) 



OFFICERS 

President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
spo tiding Secretary 
Treasurer 

Critic 

Historian 

Teller 

Teller 



ROLL 



Minna Hampton. 
Margaret Herbert. 
Clifford Heyward. 
Lucy Haywood. 
Fanny Johnson. 
Bessie Poe Law. 
Mossie Long. 
Lily Lynah. 



Aletliea McGeehee. 
Carrie Moore. 
Annie G. Sash. 
Christine Richards. 
Isabel Ruff. 
Kate Slade. 
Janet Slade. 
Annie Sloane. 
Marv Slocomb. 



Easter Term. 
Ann Kimberly Gifford. 
Rena Clark. 
Cornelia Coleman. 
Carrie Helen Moore. 
Mary Sumteh Thomas. 
Evelyn Weeks. 
Margaret Elmer George. 
Minna Hampton. 
Clifford Heyward. 

Mary Sturgeon. 
Gertrude Sullivan. 
Lucy Tayloe. 
Elizabeth Temple. 
Sarah Tyler. 
Sumter Thomas. 
Leize Weaver. 
Evelyn Weeks. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Bishop T. D. Bratton. 
Miss Kate McKimmnn. Miss Schutt. 

Miss J^ee. Miss Walton. 

Mile. Gerber. Miss Trapier. 

.Miss Hull. 

For a pupil to be eligible to this Society, it is necessary to make an average of 90 per cent on her studies. 

59 




Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

Motto : Lit with the sun. 
Flower: Yellow Jessamine. Colors: Purple and Gray. 




I LAMBDA LITERARY SOCIETY. 







Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

i'i ro : Lit with the sun. 
Flowkr: Yellow -l 'sami Coloks: Purple and 




SIGMA LAMBDA LITERARY SOCIETY. 



Sigma Lamba Literary Society 



OFFICERS 
Advent Term. Easter Term. 

Isabel Asiley Brumby President Isabel Asiiby Brumby. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose Vice-Preside tit Anna Barrow Clark. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood Secretary Lucy Taylor Redwood. 

Margaret Gray Stedman . ( 'or. Secretary Rosalie Bernhardt. 

Minnie Greenough Burgwyx Treasurer Minnie Greenough Burgwyn. 

Eliza Richards Brown Critic Margaret Gray Stedman. 

Jennie Atkinson Mtjrci-iison Sr. Teller Ida Pollard Evans. 

Ida Pollard Evans Jr. Teller Jennie Atkinson Murciiison. 



Bailey. Serena. 
Battle, Susie. 
Benedict, Nancy. 
Bernhardt, Rosalie. 
Bo wen, Josephine. 
Boylan, Josephine. 
Broad foot, Frances. 
Brown, Eliza. 
Brown, Ohla. 
Brumby, Isabel. 
Burgwyn, Minnie. 
Bynum, Susan. 
Carrison. Emily. 
Carson, Jean. 
Clark, Anna. 



Crenshaw, Helen. 
Critz, Senah. 
Cushman, Rebecca. 
Oisosway, Myrtle. 
Dixon, Mary. 
DuBose, Margaret. 
Eldridge, Virgie. 
Evans, Ida. 
Evans. Louise. 
Fairley, Effie. 
Fitz-Simons, Amy. 
Frost, Nellie. 
Glazebrook. Virgilia. 
Gibson. Ellen. 
Grant, Florrie. 



ROLL 

Gudger, Elsie. 
Higgs Emily. 
Holmes. Georgette. 
Horner. Kate. 
Hughson, Dorothy. 
Hughson. Marjorie. 
Hunter, Mattie. 
Jenkins. Sadie 
Jennings. Sarah. 
Jones. Mattie. 
Jones, Stuart. 
Lassiter, Mary. 
Lewis, Nell. 
Mackay, Margaret. 
Massey, Bessie. 



Meares, Rita. 
Montague, May. 
Murchison Jennie. 
Prince, Sue 
Redwood. Lucy. 
Robertson, Hallie. 
Robinson Mary. 
Rossell. Mamie. 
Short, Marguerite. 
Shuford, Rosa. 
Skinner, Lily. 
Skinner, Rosa. 
S locum Dorothy. 
Smith. Nannie. 
Springs. Marguerite. 



Spruill, Alice. 
Stedman, Margaret. 
Sweet, Lucy. 
Tillinghast. Linda. 
Tilton, Mildred. 
Thomas, Mary R. 
Thomas. Rosa. 
Turpin. Isabel. 
Yen able, Cantey. 
Villepigue, Mary. 
Welles, Mary. 
Whitaker, Grace. 
Wilson. Margaret. 
Winslow, Kate. 
Winston, Gertrude. 



Miss Bell. 
Miss Bowen. 
Miss Busbee. 
Miss Checkley. 



Miss Dowd. 
Mrs. DuBose. 
Mr. DuBose. 

Miss Fenner. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Margaret Jones. 
Mrs. Jenkins. 
Miss Pixley 
Mrs. Sanborn. 



Miss Saunders. 
Mr. Stone. 
Miss Sutton. 



Miss Thomas. 
Dr. Anderson. 
Mrs. Anderson. 



62 



SORORITIES 





ALPHA KAPPA P3I. 



FOUNDED AT ST. M • 

a'ERED FEBRl \S 1 



i Hue ai i ' 'oW. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 

Alpha Chapter 




ALPHA CHAPTER. £1. MARY'S, RALEIGH, N. C. 
BETA CHAPTER, VA. FEMALE JNST., STAUNTON ' 



I i iv i'i: ■ Foi'21 I i) ' nol 



CHAPTER ROLL 
i ;...,. in Critz, Senali i.nne Hunter Mattii Car i< Robertson, Hallie Bremond 

p i, Minnie fcireenough. DuBose, Margaret Rosalie. Means, Esther Bam w 11. Smith larmie' Elizabeth. 
Lnna Barrow. Fite-Simons, Amy. Perry. Meares, Harriet ■ Iward. Stedniaii Margaret Gray 

nan, Cornelia. azebrook, Virgilia Argyle. Moore, Carrie Helen r, Crac Buxton, 

ixiil l.urv Taj j 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 



Miss Check! ■■■ 



rhoma 




*L P3I. 



Alpha Kappa Psi 

Alpha Chapter 



FOUNDED AT ST. MARY'S, 1903. 
CHARTERED FEBRUARY. 1904. 



( OLOES 



Bine 



Gold. 




ALPHA CHAPTER, ST. MARY'S. RALEIGH, N. C. 
BETA CHAPTER. VA. FEMALE INST., STAUNTON, VA. 



Fi owe: Forget-me-not. 



CHAPTER ROLL 

Bowen, Josephine. Critz, Senah Anne. Hunter, Mattie Caroline. Robertson, Hallie Bremond. 

Burgwyn, Minnie Greenough. DuBose, Margaret Rosalie. Means, Esther Barnwell. Smith, Nannie Elizabeth. 

Clark, Anna Barrow. Fitz-Simons, Amy Perry. Meares, Harriet Woodward. Stedman, Margaret Cray. 

Coleman, Cornelia. Glazebrook, Virgilia Argyle. Moore, Carrie Helen. Whitaker, Grace Buxton. 

Redwood, Lucv Tavlor. 



SORORES IN FACULTATE 



Miss Checkle 



M iss Thomas. 




GAMMA BETA SIGMA. 



Gamma Beta Sigma 



FOUNDED 1901. CHARTERED FEB 




Alpha Chapter, St. 

Beta Chapti i. ■ i il H 

( lamina ( hapl < bia 

Delta Chapter, Mis - Umrl -. \\ a 



Alpha Chapter 



Fl.nWKi.' : \ 



Kosalii Bernhardt. 
Isabel Ashb-; ';i nb\ . 
Ken Ho 

I'SOI 



'l.ous : Purp 

,M:lh,l 

I ■ton Rv eel 



'.! argarel I irj hii lira Wells 

Sara I : ■' I f'ai II enabli 




GAMMA BET.-. 



Gamma Beta Sigma 



FOUNDED 1901. CHARTERED FEBRUARY 5, 1904. 




Alpha Chapter, St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 
Beta Chapter, Edgewood School, Baltimore, Md. 
Gamma Chapter, Columbia Institute, Columbia, Term. 
Delta Chapter, Miss Stuart's, Washington, D. C. 



Alpha Chapter 



Flower: Violet. 



Colors : Purple and Gold. 



ROLL 

Annie Gray Xash. 
Mary Leigh Robinson. 
.Mamie Rossell. 
Gertrude Sullivan. 
Lucy Horton Sweet. 



Rosalie Bernhardt. 

Isabel Ashbv Brumby. 
Rena Hoyt Clark. 
Jean Carson. 
Nellie Best Frost. 
Margaret Elmer George. Mary Sabra Wells. 
Sara Hicks Jennings. Cantey McDowell Venable 

Miss Lee. 




ADELINE CLIFFORD HEYWABD 

■GEORGIA- 





UP5ILON DELTA 

•FOUNDED 1902- 

Honorary Member Day. 

MissM^Kimmon. 5t.John the Evangelists 

Colors-Red^ Gold. 



SADIE MARCELLINEJEN'KIn'5 
■SOUTH CAROLINA- 







EMMA ELLIOT BARNWELL 

SOUTH CAROLINA / 



LILLIE HEVWARD LYNAH 
■ geor&ia- 



GEORGETTE RELFH H0LME5 
30UTH CAROLINA, 







r~ 



UPSfLON DELTA 



•FOUNDED IS 
| Honorary Member 
i MissM^Kimmon. Evangelists' 





■ 






A Disillusion 

My very dearest Daddy — You'll be surprised, 1 know — Of course I'll need some money the Tennis Club to pay,. 

I am hoping most sincerely that yon won't he angry, As well as the Dramatic Club (en costume for our play). 

though — In the school statistics I also have my place 

In short, I want some money — no very startling news, — (Just a small-sized photo — nothing but my face). 
But I really must pay up my debts for photos in the 

" Muse." -^ ni ' bistly conies my picture as Editor of the " Muse " — 

1 bear the bell. Can write no more. My check you 
My pictures for the Seniors are really very fine, can't refuse. 

Three-quarter length — the dress is sweet (I wish that it Write soon — I'm simply starving. I don't know what 

were mine). I'll do 

We find they're too expensive for us each to give away, Unless I get a box from home. Your loving daughter — - 
So I had some others taken, too, — the bill, of course, you'll Sue. 

pay. 

The father read this missive, then be sighed and shook his 
My Literary Society — you know I'm E. A. P. — head : 

Costs each one fifty cents, I'm told — that's very cheap, " I use d to think the ' Muse ' a book of stories bright," he 

you see ; said ; 

The German Club will be the same (this last is most " But I see I'm much mistaken — from the first page 

select) ; right on through 

My Sorority will cost much more — two dollars, I expect. ' f is only different photos of my little daughter Sue." 




■ ■■ . ■ 



A Disillusion 

Uv lea Voii i bi surprised, i u 1 1. . w — I'll need some pay, 

thai . m ivon'l lie angry, As well an i h '■ h ilir play). 

I stai i i ies 1 also have nrj ' i> 

loney — no en startling nc uall-sked phol nothing bill i 

; . . I]i in • ii]i my debt 

nines my picturi i " — 

[ In bell ' '.i i w ; ■ . ■ n more. My 

ires for tin I li ii i really very Mm , i ' refuse, 

[nai h i nig! . tl ress i sw iet (I wish i —I'm invplv starving, i i what 

ui re mini 

find they're too expensive for ns each to give i I'd ■ • ■• froi" homi . laugln 

So J u;ni nrne kei I he bill, oi • ain e, 

'1 in i irher read this missi\ e, the ud 

My Lil now I'm E. .\. P. — 

i ae fifti eei I aea p, " I used to think the ' Muse ' a boo! of ght," he 

i > ; 

tl am I h I isi i mo I ' : '- ' ■■■ ' ! : ■ taken- from page 

, : .,., | . ight '-ii through 

My Sorority will cost much more— two dollars, I expect. Lt is only diffei pliotos of ittle" < 




GERMAN CLUBS. 




L'ETOILE GERMAN CLUB. 



Etoile German Club Roll 

< 'olors : Black and Gold. 

OFFICERS 

I < i i;.\V,S'l: ' , id) \il 

l.i i. ;.',■■ i .'.,1 I sci -1 i esident. 

K i m berly G 1 1' ford, Secrela) y. 

.( 'in; vii.i \ Coi.emax, Treasurer. 

II Un Si MTEH I IIOAIAS LJdt ' 

ROLL 

etchen Barn ' Carrie Helen Mo r< Lucy Swi ■;. 

• mil Burgwyn. Hie Frost. Annie Gray Nasli. . ue 

i lai ke. Lni Gilford Lue; Red rood. Sim i r J ho nas. 

<i i li Colonial), larffaro'l Herb rl Hallie Robertson. rilin Tli as. 

!■ ■ haw. Kate Horner. Nannie Smith. Cnrpin. 

h Critz. Vlattie Hunter. Alice Spraill. la'rv Welles. 

■;■ gar i DnBose Sara Jennini Uargarel Stedman., rt'insl 

Rita Meai'es Gertrnd nil ivan. 







:man ci 



L'Etoile German Club Roll 



Colors : Black and Gold. 

OFFICERS 
Margaret Gray, Stedman, President. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood, Vice-President. 

A.\n- Kimbebit GifforDj Secretary. 

Cornelia Coleman, Treasurer. 



Gretchen Barnes. 
Minnie Burgwyn. 
Rena Clarke. 
Cornelia Coleman. 
Helen Crenshaw. 
Senah Critz. 
Margaret DuBose. 



Amy Fitz-Sirnons. 
Nellie Frost. 
Ann GifTord. 
Margaret Herbert. 
Kate Horner. 
Mattie Hunter. 
Sara Jennings. 
Rita Meares. 



Mary Sumter Thomas, Leader. 



ROLL 



Carrie Helen Moore. 
Annie Gray Nash. 
Lucy Redwood. 
Hallie Robertson. 
Nannie Smith. 
Alice SpraiU. 
Margaret Stedman. 
Gertrude Sullivan. 



Lucy Sweet. 

Lucy Tayloe. 

Mary Sumter Thomas. 

Caroline Thomas. 

Tsabel Turpin. 

Mary Welles. 

Kate Winslow. 




TAU DELTA GERMAN CLUB. 



Tau Delta German Glub 



( 'i ilor* : ' i rav and ' i-old. 



OFFICERS 

1 BOLXIXG 'Sxi ' ' ■ ;. .' . 

K i ' i i «by, 1 'ice-Presidt nl . 

. 1 1 m A rc rLK Gi. lzebiu h ik . Leader. 

\j m;.. • ret i : . i . m ER G eori i . Se retary, 

• I b XXI I-. A PKIXSOIS \1 I R< KISOI 

ROLL 



.Minn ii Beel* 

aney Benedict 
Rosalie I ; - rnhardt. 
.1 isephine Bowen. 
e iliine I ti >\ Ian. 
rown. 
I ii'iimbv. 



. ' - nim. 

■ ■ I IT.' 

U 



■ 



Li:<\ [I. •■ I'd 

■ .■ 

Kini!; 

.Jenni i VI a. 

Mary Robinsn i 
Doroth\ S i ■ mil. 
Marv Sloemnh, 



wings 
\U\r\ Sturgeon 
Mildred Cil 
I 'ante-; \ enable. 
i ei :e V' eavi - 
Evelyn W< el - 
: 'in)'- V. illi in.-. 




1 



Tau Delta German Club 



COLOKS 



Gray and Gold. 



OFFICERS 
Maey Bulling S ti -rgeo.v. President. 

Isabel Asiiin Iii;r.\ii;y. Vice-President. 

Vibgilia Argyle Glazebrook, Leader. 

AI AuiiAKKT Elmer George 



Minnie Beebe. 
Kancy Benedict. 
Rosalie Bernhardt. 
Josephine Bowen. 
Josephine Boylan. 
( )hla Brown. 
Isabel Brumby. 



Secretary. 
Jexnte Atkinson MtjrchisosTj Treasurer. 



ROLL 



Susan Bynuni. 
Margaret Connor. 
Alary Dixon. 
Elmer George. 
Ellen Gibson. 
Kate Glazebrook. 
Virffilia Glazebrook. 



Lucy Ileyward. 
Lizzie Hill. 
Emily Hodges. 
Jennie Murchison. 
Mary Robinson. 
Dorothy Slocum. 
Marv Slocomb. 



Marguerite Storings. 
Mary Sturgeon. 
Mildred Tilton. 
Cantey Venablo. 
Leize Weaver. 
Evelyn Weeks. 
Fanny Williams. 




DRAMATIC CLUB. 




> matic Club 



/ 



n. \ , l*resld< n 


OJIAS, ' IC 




■IVE COMMIT E 


\ 


11 Dl'ltl '. 




ROLL 


unie i irei noui 

i 
': rmberly. 

mm. 


Lnnie < (ray. 

Richards liri 

..■in. i (ortrude. 
Sturgeon, Mary. 



I '.f.' '" i: om;. Sec. and Firri 



Tempi ■-ill 

niton, : drcd Dransfip] 
Th una < nmti 

: ' : 111 





























m yPBl 




|Lv Jffiflje 






mk 


.is 

1 . * 






fen 8 

• . ■ 


1! 






\ 


' 




7^^777?. 




Dramatic Club 



Mtldked TiltoNj President. 



Spmtee TllOMASj Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Axx GlFFORD. MlNNIE BuBGWYK 

ROLL 
Burgwyn, Minnie Greenough. Nasli, Annie Gray. 



Leize Weaver, Sec. and Treas. 
Mary Sturgeon. 



Brown, Ohla. 
Connor, Margaret. 
Gifford, Ann Kirnberly. 

Hampton, Minna. 



Robinson, Mary Leig 
Richards, Christine. 

Sullivan, Gertrude. 
Sturgeon, Mary. 



Temple, Elizabeth. 
Tilton, Mildred Dransfield. 
Thomas, Mary Sumter. 
Weaver, Leize Holmes. 
Welles, Marv Sabre. 




Miss Fexxek, President. 



Heloise Beehe. 
jSTancy Benedict. 
Josephine Bowen. 



Sketch Club 

OFFICERS 
^ Josephine Bowex, Secretary. 
ROLL 



Maky L. Eobixsox, Treasurer. 



Mary B. Dixon. 
Ellen Dovtcli. 
Emmie Drewry. 
M. Stuart Jones. 



Mary L. Robinson. 
1 lorothy Slocmii. 
Nannie E. Smith. 
Marv R. ThomiB. 



Mildred Tilton. 
( 'onrtney Watts. 
Leize Weaver. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Miss Fenner. Miss M. M. Jones. 




stir 



TENNIS CLUB. 



The Tennis Club 

OFFICERS 
i.i i ^ '!'.',- dent 

I iliAY Sl'EDMi .-. , ; . 

Kkvu i:u Hah wkli Heaxs, 6''-. retary. 

M.un Jii.Li.iM, g n roei IA-. Treasurer. 
ROLL 

-1 .' [OR i i SOI Hi I iIOKB. FRESHMAN. 

; ;i rl pgari-t DuBoso Captain, l.Iarj Welles. Captain, Minnie Beebe. 

linnnb' I ; . i )■ .. I) . 11. Beebe. 

liwyn. ItiMn 11. .Tones. S. ( 'ritz. 

i >. Morrill. Ii. I 'nshmaii. 

■ ■ -. II. Ri » - E. Davis. 

'■ ii'd. L. Sv el V. G lazehi > 

innton. M. Welles. . S Jo 

S. Prinei 

i ii . r ) . s loc n i ii 

- M. Sloei mil . 

Si John. 
iotl. ( I. Sullivan. 

ion. G. Whital 

l\ Willi; ii 
; ' . ' i ■ i mole. 

ifl |i i 
K Ii >V Ii s. 

\\ ' |lO|M 




Ik 



TENNIS CLUB 



The Tennis Club 



OFFICERS 
Lucy Taylor Redwood, President. 

Margaret Gray' Stedman, Vice-President. 

Esther Barnwell Means, Secretary. 

Mary Bulling Sturgeon, Treasurer 
ROLL 

SENIOR. JUNIOR. SOPHOMORE. 

Captain, Margaret Herbert Captain, Margaret DuBose Captain, Mary Welles. 



I. Brumby. 
M. Burgwyn. 
K. ( ioleman. 
£. George. 
A. Gifford. 
M. Hamnton. 
M. Herbert. 
M. Hughson. 
E. Means. 

C. Moore. 
L. Redwood. 

II. Robertson. 
M. Stedman. 
M. Sturgeon. 



S. Battle. 
X. Benedict. 
•I. ! 'arson. 
A. < lark. 
M. DnBose. 
E. Gibson. 
E. Gudger. 
I). Iln«hson. 
S. Jenkins. 
L Weaver. 
E. Weeks. 



II. ( 'rensliaw. 
M. • I ones. 
O. Morrill. 
M. Rossell. 
L. Sweet. 
M. Welles. 



FRESHMAN. 

Captain, Minnie Beebe. 

M Beebe. 

S. Critz. 

R. Cushman. 

E. Davis. 

V. Glazebrook. 
S. Jones. 
S. Prince. 
I). Slocum. 
M. Sloeomb. 
M. St. John. 
G. Sullivan. 
G. Whitaker. 

F. Williams. 
K. Glazebrook. 
F. Kidder. 

J. Knowles. 
M. Short. 



gASKETgALL 



Margaret Gray Stedman, President. 

Lucy Taylor Redwoou, Secretary. 

A.\.\ K I MBERLY (il l- TOED, T ' i-cii.su rr r. 



rtUB 





ALPHA ROLL. 




BETA ROLL. 


Boy Ian. 


Jones, M. 


Burgwyn. 


Knowles. 


Brown. 


Jones, M. S. 


Brunibi . 


Redwood. 


Garrison. 


Prince. 


Bernhardt. 


Rossell. 


Carson. 


Robinson. 


Beebe. 


Thomas, M. B 


Croft. 


SpreiilL 


Battle. 


Smith. 


Davis. 


Slocomb. 


Coleman. 


Sweet. 


Frost. 


Sturgeon. 


Clark. 


Slade. 


George. 


Sh.ii-1 . 


Crenshaw. 


Stedman. 


Gibson. 


Thomas, M. S. 


Evans. 


St. John. 


Gifford. 


Thomas, C. 


Edmunds. 


Villipigue. 


Glazebrook. 


Turpin. 


Jones, S. P. 


Weeks. 


Hardy. 


Weaver. 


Kidder. 




Hey ward. 


Welles. 






Herbert. 


Winston. 







gASKET gALL 



VI A KG UtKT lili.'.V S'l'KliMAX. / ' rrsu l<> n I . 

. v Tah [.ok R] i>\ 1), * iv/fl 

Ann Kim ii-ekt.y Giki ■'.■.'■ 



C LUB 





ALPB * ROl 1 • 


i; Ian. 


.In,,,-. M. 


a. 


.lones, M. S. 


i on. 


Prince. 


■ ■ on. 


Robinson. 




fcSprnill 




Sloeo 




Sim r: li 


< reorge. 


Short. 


! . i 


: 1 oinas, M. S 


rr] 


: nomas, C. 




Tnrpin. 




ver, 


! reyward. 


Wi ! 


I ferbevl 


Winston. 



»vyii. 

: 

t. 

i ' 

i i ■ man. 

■ 

!■ i mini] 

. S. V. 
K i. rlev. 



BETA 



Know] 

ell. 

'■■ m - 

man. 
ihn. 




BETA TEAM. 




ALPHA TEAM. 



Beta T Alpha Team Roll 

( 'oi;oks: Uc j «l ! !olor \\ liiti 

OFF1C1 , OFFICERS 

"'■M^-i'i!'.'. 1 'ap ■ : ■■■. i i i ■ n rgj o.\ ' 'a.j fawi, 

Mak, abut Stbdmak , I n tswr, : Xr - un Sl v ! TKIi Thomas, Xm-etcmj 



■ 



\ i i' i \\ i \ -'i i : •■ Sri;i i i.i , '/'/ , . 
YELL 



') aekety yack ! Yacke.t; , Ki tin kimo, ka ro, n arc ' 

II,.,,. . three ciieers f«i I Tim; i Tim; with A 



■ i boom bah ! Si- I.kk>i 
Beta! Hoi a! Rah! Rah 

TEA 

Susie. 



! .'inn sti Hummy diddle, 

X ii i .'Hi penny wink le - • tip 
Kong il ' v ■■■■'■ r i " i ,-ou 'in.'". 
Alpha, Alpha, Rah!!!!! 






timer Geo V! Hi r\ Sl mri'i.ii. 

I ] - 'II I 'I 

Luev llevwaril ibel I iirpn 

; aeel Viroilia Glazi brt.nl ! ei iVeavi 

i 'ovnelia. Villi |>i$>,i ' To ephine Boylan. VI » ! < V< piles. 



Beta Team Roll 



Alpha Team Roll 



Colors 



Red and Black. 



Color: White. 



OFFICERS 

Cok.xkt.ia Colemau, Captain. 

Makoaket Stedmax, Secretary and Treasurer. 

YELL 

Yackety yack ! Yackety yack ! 

Here's three cheers for the red and black ! 

Sis boom bah! Sis boom bah ! 

Beta! Beta! Rah! Rah! Rah! 



OFFICERS 



TEAM 



Battle, Susie. 
Beebe, Heloise. 
Brumby, Isabel. 
Coleman, Cornelia. 



Rossell, Mary. 
Stedman, Margaret. 
Sweet, Lucy. 
Villepigne, Mary. 



Mary Bolliicg Sturgeon, Captain. 

Mary Sumter Thomas, Secretary. 
Alice Wix.ston Sphuill. 



Kemo, kimo, karo, ware! 
Timy I Timy will. A 
Rum strum flummy diddle, 
Nip cat penny winkle sing' 
Song kitty won't you kimeo. 
Alpha. Alpha. Rah!!!!! 



Treasurer. 



Elmer George. 
Lucy Heywanl. 
Vivo'ilia Glazebrook. 
Josephine Boylan. 



Mary Sturgeon. 
Isabel Turpin. 
Lcize Weaver. 
Marv Welles. 





INSIDE OF CHAPEL. 



Missionary Chapters 



'ARY'S BRANCH Of : ARY 

W u/roN i ideni 

' : "ON . . '., tident 

McKimmon rid Tri usurer 



AR GUILD 

^is 'i' I ■■ ,V, en 

lKr.ii Presidi »l. 

Rena (i Treasurer. 

ST. CATHERINE'S CHAPTER 

has . Directress. 

-■■••I l>e BofiJE ; 

L..\Rl:i iL.r. Uhli GeORGE . '■ .. 

i n Redwood iSWr. I i 

rVEIJ M V '■ , ' .. 



ST. ETH ... " JA'S CHAPTER 

Mrs. DuBose Directn ss. 

Mildred i'u ton — 

SlJMTE] Fh< S ■. " 

A !.!•'; Si>»un 

Batti.j 

■ 





INSIDE OF CHAPEL. 



Missionary Chapters 



ST. MARY'S BRANCH OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

Miss Walton President. 

Miss Sutton Vice-President. 

Miss McKimmon Secretary and Treasurer. 



ALTAR GUILD 

Miss McKimmon Superintendent. 

Carkie Helen Moore President. 

Rena Clark Treasurer. 

ST. CATHERINE'S CHAPTER 

Miss Thomas Directress. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose President. 

Margaret Elmer George Vice-President. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood Secretary. 

Esther Barnwell Means Treasurer. 



ST. ETHELDREDA'S CHAPTER 

Mrs. DuBose Directress. 

Mildred Tilton President. 

Sumter Thomas Vice-President. 

Alice Spruill Secretary. 

Susie Battle Treasurer. 

S7 



ST. ELIZABETH'S CHAPTER 

Mrs. Sanborn Directress. 

Minnie Burgwyn President. 

Rosalie Bernhardt Vice-President. 

Josephine Bowen Secretary. 

Virgilia GlazebroOK Trrasn rcr. 



ST. MONICA'S CHAPTER 

Miss McKlMMON Directress. 

Same Jenkins President. 

Marjorie Hughson Vice-President. 

Rebecca Ctisi-i max Secretary. 

Minnie Beebe Treasurer. 



ST. MARGARET'S CHAPTER 

.M iss Bowen Directress. 

( Ii.ivj: Morrim President. 

Mildred Edmunds Vice-President. 

Margaret Herbert Secretary and Treasurer. 

ST. ANNE'S CHAPTER 

.M iss Sutton Directress. 

• I EAN ( LvRSON President. 

Frances IIii.i Vice-President. 

Kmily 1 )ki:\vi;v Secretary. 

[vatk Glazebrook Treasurer. 



*Jo ^Sfiiss ^7/i 



omcis. 



fill appr* ■ udion I hi r i«ifc in; • • u ■ of her inti rent 

"ml ret h \>i — not only to u, editors, lm Mary's yh'l — 

o loin ■ i u die t tlu literary ■■' ■;' this ' I 




ST. ELIZABETH'S CHAP: 

ik> ■ Dir < ■ 

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Ro.> - . . : • it Via • 

EN S 

. . .' Trea. 



ST. MONK." Si ; TE] 

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Sail : I : KI.N'S 

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ii'l IM : I A. I I SI] MAX 

M ina'ie Bf.i bk usurer. 



.T'S CHAPTER 

ih Bowk: Direct rests. 

Ot.ivj Mork Pi 

Mn.ni I i' Ft< 

Al \m. iKKT II . .'. hurt Secret 

ST. ANNE'S CHAPTER 

fcj I'TON / 

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1-'i.a.\. i:s Hi 1. 1 ; 

K'.IM i I) Hi 

■ Kati'. < ti.Azi 1 uuooi 



C/o ^iiiss Uh 



omeis. 



In grateful appreciation of her untiring patience, of her interc.it 
and ready help — not only to us editors, but to every St. Mary's girl — 
we lovingly dedicate the literary part of this "Muse." 




Colonial Literature— A Sketch 




HE LITERATURE of the New World began when Captain John Smith — soldier, sailor and 
scholar — sent back to England in 1608, his account of early Virginian life. It was much 
later, and in England that he wrote his " Historic" of Virginia, but we claim this likewise 
as a stepping-stone from English literature to its new branch in America. 

His writings being autobiographical, it was easy for him to become at times very egotis- 
tical, but even when this is too obtrusive, we pass it over and forget it under the spell of his 
naivete and the freedom and ease of expression through which shines, in spite of quaint 
wording and original spelling, his travel-worn but unconquerable spirit. 
In a very difierent style from Smith's are the few records left us of John Rolfe's letters, written like Smith's 
stories back to the old country. The " Coppie" of this "Gentle-man's" formal epistles, with their evenly balanced 
phrases, long words and anxious sentiments, give as good an insight into his character as Smith's writing did into 
his, and these two men may be taken as the first types of the two classes which were formed later, the Cavaliers and 
the Puritans, as their dissimilar manner and matter in writing may stand as examples of the style of the literature 
written by those two classes. 

The Cavalier, broad-minded enough to love this world and the next too, wrote according to his lights — the 
Puritans thought it darkness — and to this division belong not only those who lived south of a certain parallel of lati- 
tude, but those also of the northern colonies who ventured to write what they thought in spite of the Puritanical at- 
mosphere surrounding them. 

Sir William Byrd, in one of his plain-spoken letters, voices Cavalier views when he speaks of the hypocritical 
dealings of certain " Saints of New England." 

Among the New Englanders who wrote in un-Puritanical style were Thomas Morton who viewed the events 
he recorded from a story teller's and not from a historian's standpoint, and Judge Sewall. whose laborious diary shows 



quite a lively interest in the affairs of this world, and affords us many faithful, though unconscious pictures of the life 
of his day. 

The Puritan, earnestly intent on developing his soul, became so engrossed in that occupation that he usually 
forgot he had a heart, and wrote either introspective analyzings of an overworked conscience or bitter denunciations 
of sect against sect, in which no whip could lash as scathingly as these men lashed each other with words. 

Also, strangely discordant with their deep and strong, though narrow-minded, faith in God, there w : as a super- 
stitious line of thought which at first affected onlj' slightly their literature as shown in such writings as Increase 
Mather's devout accounts of what seemed to him powerful and direct interpositions of Providence, and what were 
really only the commonplace details of every-day life, but which grew afterwards into the ugly records of that distor- 
tion of spirituality, witchcraft. 

Cotton Mather is the most important of that family of diffuse writers, the Mathers, but even his works are of 
little value and less interest to-day. 

Of poetry, either Cavalier or Puritan, there was very little that was not utterly insignificant, and that little 
was usually concerned with subjects so insipid or so gruesome that it is worth nothing for itself, and is regarded only 
in the consideration of the development of the literature. 

Of the many plodding historians of the early life of the colonies who wrote down from day to day indiscrimi- 
nately, happenings good, bad and indifferent, there was but one who rose above the dead-level, and William Steachey, 
at least, was able to give as graphic pictures in strong and expressive language. 

Finally, we come to Jonathan Edwards, half Cavalier, half Puritan, in his ideas, who wrote with such exquisite 
gentleness of his "sweet sense of divine things" and who pictured on the other hand with such power the terrors and 
misery of eternal punishment and spoke of angels who rejoiced in Heaven "to see the sufferings of the damned." Be- 
sides being a theologian, Edwards was also a philosopher, and though his theories are disproved to-day, yet they were 
argued in such powerful and convincing style, that his is the one name of real importance that has come down to us 
from all Colonial Literature. 

E. B. M. '04. 



" Pin Tap," a Living Remnant of the Old South 

For :i long time Edisto, one of the Sea Islands of South Carolina, has been known as " Pin Tap." This 
is a translation of the English words " Upon Top " into the peculiar dialect of the negroes of that vicinity. But its 
name is only one of the unusual or interesting things that might he told about this island, a place attractive for its 
living beauty and for its relics of a time now past. Its plantations, many of which are owned by descendants of 
the original grantees, recall the days when the Lords Proprietors attempted to establish in the Carolinas an ideal 
government by aristocrats, and the names of certain landgraves are not yet forgotten by those " native and to the 
manner born." 

If you visit " Pin Tap " and wish to see some of its most attractive places, you must first drive down the main 
road. This long 44 public road," extending from one end of the island to the other, is bordered on each side by mam- 
moth old live-oaks, whose branches, meeting overhead form a low, continuous archway. Long, soft gray moss hangs 
from each tree, and every now and then, on the sides of the road, may be seen little swamps, shadowy, mysterious 
swamps, with vines crossing and recrossing from bush to bush, and all losing their ends in the cool, dark water be- 
neath them. The avenues, turning into this larger one, wind through acres and acres of cotton, for here grows the 
best long-staple cotton of the world. Its blossoms are in all different stages of development — some a bright, rich 
yellow, others, two or three hours older, a soft red; and still others in the shape of little green pods, which can 
scarcely be distinguished from the dark olive luxuriance of leaves : and last of all, the open bolls with the silky 
fluffy, pure-white fibres falling from their every crevice. 

One of these avenues leads you for a mile through pines and oaks, and then suddenly emerges on a wide ex- 
panse of sand bounded on the left by a broad river. Soon the road runs through more fertile soil and you find acres 
of cotton on one hand and a field of watermelon vines on the other. You can not help noticing a large sign on the 
outskirts of the melon patch ; it is a huge death's head, and beneath it are printed the words, " Some of these melons 
are poisoned." This poisoning of melons is the planter's only means of keeping the darkies from ravaging the crop. 
And even then some of the harmless watermelons go, and the poisoned ones, if taken, seem to have no ill effect on 
the health of these marvellously constituted, dusky-skinned thieves. 

The road finally turns into an avenue formed by fifty or so tremendous, warrior-like live-oaks, venerable trees 
that have withstood the attacks of storm, earthquake and war for three hundred years. On both sides, through the 
gnarled branches and drooping foliage of the oaks, may be seen the spike-like green leaves of the palmettoes growing 
on the water-side, for this avenue leads you over a neck of the island to a peninsula about a quarter of a mile square, 
at whose point the rivers flowing on both sides converge. Here, where the peninsula begins, through the gray moss 
that you push aside from before your face, you see parts of a large brick house, with a slanting-roofed piazza 
extending almost across its whole front. Two or three smiling little darkies hold the gate open for you, and you 
enter the estate of " Brick House." The house, of which von had caught glimpses through the moss, stands in 

92 



the middle of the peninsula. On nearer view, it looks old, and your companion tells you that its " looks do not 
belie it." For three hundred years it, like the trees, has stood here. The materials for its construction were all 
brought from across the ocean, and the architect also. But the only visible relic of the latter is a marble face built 
into the middle of the eastern side of the house, and even this is a rather indefinite remembrance, for the boys of 
every generation of the family that has for so long a time lived here, have each tried to see which could do the most 
in effacing its features by means of rocks and other destructive missiles. 

An old gentleman comes forward to meet you, his age seen not at all in his erect, soldierly carriage, but 
only in his gray hair and white beard. There is a certain old-time chivalry in his manner, which, together with the 
colonial aspect of the house makes you wonder if you have not been transported a hundred years back. He takes 
you into the parlor and explains with pride how old are those queer, graceful creatures painted above and around 
the marble mantel-piece; and in which places the different family portraits had hung; and how between those two 
windows a long mirror used to stand beneath a brass eagle of Revolutionary clays, holding in his beak a scroll in- 
scribed with the Declaration of Independence. But portraits, mirror and eagle had all been taken during the war 
between the States. Of course you have chosen one of the deep window seats as your resting-place, and you are 
somewhat surprised to hear a tap outside under the open window. 

" 'Sense me, ma'm, 'sense me — Massa dey yeh ? " 

" I — maybe — let me see," and you rush bewildered to your host — 

" Some one is under the window, sir, trying to say something." 

The old gentleman goes to the window. 

" Massa, got any pain-killer ? " 

" Yes, Leander ; who's sick ? " 

" Well, suh, you see, me wife, she done hab a headache, sub, an' me little gyul done eat too much watermil- 
lion, 'seusin' me son, suh, who hab run a fish-hook een 'e ban", an' I ain' feel more'n so-an'-so, meself, suh." 

You are astounded. " Will one medicine cure all these things ? " you ask. 

" Oh, yes, and more than these," the " Massa-doctor " laughingly replies. 

Then, as the sun begins to go down, the person who brought you to this old plantation drives a buggy up 
under a monster live-oak before the house, as a gentle suggestion that you have very little time to drive to his plan- 
tation before dark. As you sit in the buggy ready to start off, the old gentleman calls out, 

" You had better take care; you are on dangerous ground." 

But you know what he means, for you have been told that the daughters of this family for many generations 
have been courted under this very tree, and that even outsiders are not safe here. 

By the time you have passed the overseer's house and through the negro " quarters," in front of every cabin 
of which were small fires burning to keep away mosquitoes, it is twilight, and there floats across the cotton to you 

93 



only the croaking of frogs, and the solitary song' of some darkey on the river cutting marsh, or perhaps the melodious 
sound of negroes singing in chorus, blending with the creaking of the old ox-cart piled with corn-stalks, lazily mak- 
ing its way through the corn-field. And thus you drive on and on, past the road leading to old Governor Aiken's 
plantation, "Jehossee," and past the plantation of the two Governors Seabrook, " Gunbluff," while your companion 
tells you of the other old estates whose names are not the least attractive part of them — " Cypress Trees," " Old 
Dominion," "Shell House," "Swallow Bluff," "Ravenswood." As he mentions this last one, the Presbyterian 
graveyard comes into view, and these two things, your companion remarks as he begins to tell you a story, make 
one tale of the many that float around this mystic place stand out in his mind. 

Yon turn into your friend's avenue and the narration begins. 

"Although ' Uncle Ephraim ' had inherited the beautiful and extensive estate of ' Ravenswood,' one would 
have taken him for the poorest man in the land, on account of his extreme stinginess. - He was cowardly, also, 
and both of these traits may be observed in the following incident. 

"One summer day, ' Uncle Ephraim' went to the city to do his wife's shopping; he was afraid that she 
would spend too much money if she went for herself. He got back to the Edisto wharf late in the afternoon, and 
after tying many bundles to his saddle, he started for home, with just a little trembling in his knees, and with a 
posture not as upright as if he were ready to do battle with the ghosts he expected to meet before the end of his 
journey. Slowly he went all the length of the landing-road, for lie knew he was safe until he reached the public 
highway. But try as hard as he could to keep it far off, this latter seemed to run to meet him. As he turned into 
it, his knees began to tremble violently, for there was the Presbyterian graveyard almost in sight. Soon he reached 
the nearest end of the fence enclosing it. 

" The horse begins to tremble, then dashes forward. ' Uncle Ephraim ' looks behind and sees something 
broad and white fluttering on the back of the animal. ' Go on.' he shouts, and gives an extra hard jab with his 
spurs. Faster and faster rushes the horse, frenzied by fear and the pain from his lashings. The whiteness, .for it 
can not be called a substance, grows longer at each pace, sometimes flapping gently against the old man's back. 
Every time this happens he fairly doubles up with terror. These three — the man, the horse, the whiteness — seem 
to leave everything they pass, white; for when "Uncle Ephraim looks back again, as far as he can see down the road 
there is a white streak, whiter than the moonlight. But here is his avenue ! Surely this awful fabrication will keep 
to the straight way when he turns ! But no ; as the horse whirls around, gracefully the being curves its filmy self 
to follow it. Home at last! and in the house! But terror-stricken eyes look to see if the ghostly spirit will float 
through the closed door and twist itself around their owner. Indeed, it must have been the shades of all his ances- 
tors put together, it was so long. 

" The next morning the coachman found a winded horse lying at the front door, and from the saddle-bag it 
bore stretched peacefully twenty yards of white linen." S. M. J. '05. 



To You 



"lis morning, and the grey night mist 

Is changing into golden day ; 
The radiance of the sun hath kissed 

The flowers' tears away. 

(I love you in, the dawn, lore, 

When all the east is streaked with light : 
The sunbeams weave a gown of gold — 
For you 'tis not too bright.) 

The day hath waned, groves apart 
Are soft with shadows of the trees ; 

A fragrance, once a. flower's heart, 
Is drifting on the sunset breeze. 

(I love you in the even, love, 

As sweeter, paler grow the shies; 
Your lips are roses half asleep, 

More soft than twilight are your eyes.) 

The moon is mirrored in a lake, 

Where water-lilies float and dream ; 

Bright ripples on the far shores break, 
The very waves as star worlds seem. 

(Loir roices call you, call you, love. 
And will you stay so far, so far? 
Lo. while I breathe my heart to you . 
The night wind whispers to a star.) 

— M. H. '0-t. 



The Rushing of Betty 



( hie May afternoon when all the apple and cherry trees 
were in blossom, when the grass was rich and green, when 
the orioles and humming- birds were running a race from 
flower to flower with the butterflies, and the warm after- 
noon sunshine was pouring down over everything, two lit- 
tle figures could be seen walking slowly up the country 
road on their way home from school. The boy was 
about ten years old, with red hair and a round, jolly freck- 
led face. He was shuffling his bare feet along delightedly 
in the warm dust, his books and the girl's strapped to- 
gether were thrown over his shoulder, and his whole air was 
one of blissful content. The little girl was two or three 
years younger. Her gingham sunbonnet hung back on her 
shoulders, and her black hair escaping from her two tight 
braids curled all around her face. 

"' Ralph," she inquired suddenlv, glancing at him 
through her eyelashes, " do you love me ? " 

" Sure," answered the boy. " Why ? " 

" I don't see how you expect me to know it," the girl 
explained in a grieved tune. Ralph looked up in aston- 
ishment. 

'Golly gee! don't I always choose you on my side in 
prisoner's base '. Ain't I walking home and carrying your 
books, now \ What do you want me to do? " 

" I don't know, "zactlv," admitted the girl; "but when 
people love Sister they send her things. There's one now, 
who told me he was 'rushing' her, and he gives her more 
candy anil flowers and things ! Why don't you rush me? " 

" 1 ilun'l know how. Hut I will do anything you say, 

96 



Betty," answered Ralph, obligingly. Accordingly, Bet- 
ty promised to talk it over with sister and find out just 
how llie thing was done. 

Betty's first instructions were that Ralph should call. 
" ( 'all '. " said Ralph, a puzzled look stealing into his eyes. 
"Call what?" 

"Oh, don't you know?" Bettie was rather vexed at 
this ignorance of the part of her lover. " When grown 
folks go to see people, they call. You must call at night." 

" Really, Betty, I'd like to awful, but Ma won't let me 
go out after dark." 

Then a bright thought struck him. " If you like, though, 
I'd just as lief run away and come call. What time do 
you go to bed? " 

" Right early," confessed Betty. "Don't you suppose 
it would be all right if you called in the afternoon? " 

" Every afternoon ? " inquired Ralph, anxiously, as vis- 
ions of baseball floated through his brain. But the visions 

disappeared when Bettv smiled. 

•:<■ -:■:• * " * * * * * 

" Ralph " — Betty's tone was plaintively patient — " Sis- 
ter's rusher don't come to see her all the time." Ralph 
had interrupted a most exciting doll tea-party. 

" I thought 'twas rusliin'," explained Ralph. 

"Oh, dear, no! Just callin' ain't rushin'. Sister's 
rusher sends her candy." 

" All right." Ralph was game to the backbone. 

The next day at school Betty found a bag of gum-drops 



on her ilesk. 'Phis kepi up until one day after an especi- 
ally big hag, Betty did not come to school. 

" Oh, Betty," said Ralph, running to meet her as she 
came down the road next morning. " Why ever didn't 
yon come to school yestiddy ? Miss Hines caught Sissy 
Bailey chewing gum in class and stood her right out in 
the rloor ? Why did you stay away ? " 

"' Oh, Ralph," said Betty, paling a little at the remem- 
brance, "please don't send me any more gum-drops or 
candy. I was so sick." 

" Ralph," asked Betty, several days later, as they walked 
home together up the lane, " you haven't stopped courtin', 
have you ? " 

" Well, the gum-drops — " began Ralph. 

" Oh, no," hastily interrupted Betty, " I don't want 
any more candy. But Sister gets flowers." 

"What kind?" Ralph was going to play his part or die. 

" Roses, beauties, all red and sweet." Betty sniffed 
with delight. The few days following Betty brought back 
small bunches of roses from the school — little yellow bush 
roses they were, but to Betty they were American Beauties. 

" Ralph," asked Bettv, " why were von late to school 
to-day?" 

" Pa kept me." Ralph did not seem to want to dwell 
on the subject. But Betty had her share of curiosity. 



'" Why '. " she persisted. 

" Licked me." Ralph's tone, like his answer, was short. 

"Oh, Ralph!" Betty's eves were big with horror. 
" Did it hurt ? Why ? "' 

" Not much. He said I stole." Ralph began whistling 
to show bow little he cared. 

" How perfectly awful. Ob, Ralph, what did he say 
you stole ? " Betty's tone was awestruck. 

Silence. 

" Ralph." 

Silence. 

"Ain't you going to tell me what you stole? " 

Silence. 

Then suddenly a great light broke over Betty. 

" Ralph," she asked, " who gave you those roses? " 

" Nobody." 

" Ralph," Betty faced him, her sunbonnet was hanging 
on her shoulders as usual, her hair was very black, her 
cheeks were very red, and her eyes were very blue, " did 
you get licked for stealing my roses? Ob, Ralph, T think 
you are the grandest thing! 1 love you! " 

" Ralph," said Betty a few minutes later after she bad 
rubbed her cheeks as hard as she could trying to wipe off 
what Ralph had put there, " don't let's court any more. I 
tell you what let's do now. Let's pretend we are little bov 
and girl." A. K. G. '04. ' 



A Valentine 



Stolen ! by a maiden fair. 
With smiling eyes and sunny hair. 
My heart ! the only one I had — 
Was ever there a case so sad ? 

Muse— 13 



And baby Cupid was not blind ; 

When he saw you, my Valentine, 

His arm w r as strong, his aim » as true ; 

He pierced my poor heart through and through. 



I would not, could not have it back, 
Yet every day I mourn my lack. 
You've stolen my heart without ado. 
So Valentine dear, please take me too ! 

M. R. DuB '05. 

97 



The Silent Valley 



In a certain country, there is a narrow valley where the trees grow straight and tall, seemingly trying to look 
over the tops of the enclosing hillsides into the valleys beyond — hillsides so steep that it is a very wonder the trees 
keep their balance at all, and do not go rolling down like some fragment of rock that, loosened from its moss bed 
high up on the slope, hurries to hide among the leaves at the foot of the hill. 

Of all the trees growing there the most beautiful is a gleaming beech which stands at the head of the valley. 
for this beech was once the dwelling place of the nymph whose slightest wish was the law for the valley and all it 
contained. Now, every year, on the last day of April it was the custom of the nymph to listen to all of her subjects 
who chose to claim her favor, and a request then made had never been known to remain ungranted. 

One year, just at the dawn of this magic day, came the first petition — a little stray breeze that told how, many 
days since, it had been chasing some Huffy white cloudlets over the ocean and reaching land, had lost its way among 
the puzzling lines of rivers and hills. And it begged the nymph to send it back safe to the sea. Before its story was 
finished the leaves of the beech tree stirred softly, and a cool wind came down and catching up the breeze in its arms 
was off so quickly that its last words floated back like a sigh through the trees. And then a tiny violet, dimmed by 
a tear-drop of dew, sobbed out its loneliness and fear from where it lived all by itself behind a big rock. So the nymph 
gave it a home at the foot of her own beech, and for companions surrounded it with ferns as graceful and delicate as 
the violet itself. 

While the shadows grew short and black and then slowly lengthened and paled again, the nymph list- 
ened to many a petition, until finally, just as the last sunbeam touched a moss-covered rock near the beech tree and 
lingered there, a sparkling spring bubbled out from beneath the rock and spoke in rippling appeal. 

" ( )h, Nymph ! " it said, " I am the voice of a stream which Hows deep down below your valley — a prisoner 
bound in darkness and unceasing silence, with only this short moment of release which comes once each year while 
the daylight is fading. Each year have 1 arisen at the call of the last sunbeam, but never have I claimed this day's 
blessing from you. For the snow from the mountains has for the first time told me, as it melted and came down 
through the paths of the earth to join my waters, of you who lived in the valley above me. Grant my prayer and 
give me a path through the wildflowers, that I may be free — free to mirror their nodding heads, to answer the call 
of the birds, to run races with the breeze, and, when the sun has set, to carpet the valley with twin stars to those that 
look down through the tree tops." 

98 



" Pour Stream," answered the nymph, " I will indeed try to help you. If, for a hundred years longer you waL 
without once uttering a sound, giving up even this yearly day of release, your freedom will be won." 

The last sunbeam slid from the rock and climbing the opposite slope of the valley, disappeared into the twi 
light, and at the same instant the spring sank murmuring out of sight. 

Almost a hundred years passed away, and the stream flowed on below the valley, hollowing out for itself 
wonderful arched halls, and waiting patiently for the day to come that would bring it up from darkness to the light 
and freedom it craved. 

While the stream was so busy, however, its existence had been almost forgotten by the nymph in the new in- 
terest she had found in a mortal maiden. One radiant afternoon, early in the year, when the valley hail just awak- 
ened to its first soft blossoming in the new warmth of the sunlight, she saw the mortals entering her valley. One was 
a man who broke with intruding footsteps upon the quiet of her realm, and the other, a girl so sweet and fair that she 
seemed almost a part of the woodland life through which she moved. The sunshine lost its way in her hair and grew 
content to dwell there. Her eyes were the shadowy reflection of the tender depths of the skies, and her soul was the 
imprisoned spirit of a wild rose. 

As she came down the valley, the nymph forgot her resentment at the intrusion — forgot everything but the pres- 
ence of the girl herself, and when the two had reached the nymph's own beech tree and stopped to rest there, the 
leaves above them whispered in murmurous ecstasy an echo to their words. 

In the glorifying sunset light they went away again, but slowly, so slowly that long before they left the val- 
ley, the nymph lost sight of them in the deepening twilight. The next evening they returned when the shadows be- 
gan to grow slant, leaving only as the sunshine left, and so for many evenings, until once when a storm kept them 
away for a whole long week the nymph missed them sorely and rejoiced that the first sunn}' afternoon brought them 
back as usual. And so intent was she on watching for them that she let pass unnoticed an unusual restlessness which 
had wandered up and down the valley all day. 

The trees were aquiver with the knowledge of the secret that made the ferns and flowers huddle together in 
little frightened groups, and the birds to settle into rest only to rise again and fly round and round in aimless circles 
above their nests. The rocks alone remained passive and indifferent, for they at least were secure, but beneath the 
valley the hidden stream knew it best of all and pulsated responsive to the earth thrill that would soon pass into 
sound and be shared by the listening air. 

For the stream knew how the storm had torn and broken the snow on the mountains above and had sent down 
through the mountain Mays a hastening torrent that drew nearer each instant to overwhelm the lovers in the valley 
of the nymph. 

If only this once they would not wait for the sunset! If only they could be warned! But there was no way 



to warn them — except — and the stream thought of the long years of its waiting and the short space of days now that 
divided it from its reward. 

And still the lovers loitered in unshadowed happiness until just as they reached the middle of the valley the 
nymph saw them stand and look round as if suddenly listening. Then she listened, too, and ceased watching them 
as she caught sight of a tiny brooklet that was hurrying towards them from beneath a moss-covered rock near the 
beech, trying with inarticulate ripples to urge them to flee. 

The stir in the valley was hushed into breathless silence as the voice of the stream was echoed in growing thun- 
der by the first rush of the coming snow stream that roared nearer and nearer — and then suddenly died away as it 
chose a far off valley for its course and left this valley untouched. The lovers were saved — and the stream was lost, 
for had it not broken its vow '? 

Reluctantly, sadly the nymph sent it to glide yet deeper among the foundations of the earth. 

The valley lies still in that same breathless silence, broken only at the end of every hundred years, when the 
shadow of a nymph's pity hovers over it, and the wind, with a sound like the voice of waters, moans through the 
trees in the silent valley. 



E. B. M. 'ii4. 



t2r* r&* f£r* £?* 

The Fir Tree and the Palm 

In the silence stands a fir tree 

Where the sea is frozen deep ; 
And the wind lias rocked him roughly, 

Savagely to sleep. 

He is dreaming of a palm tree 
In the golden morning-land, 

Grieving in her unloved beauty. 
Lonely on the burning sand. 

— M. IT. '04. 

Translated from the German of Heine. 



Dolly Martha 



" Dolly Martha — oh you Dolly Martha, why don't you answer your mother when she calls you? If I have 
called you once I have called you most as many times as you have tried to put my ears out slamming that door. 
Will you please tell me why 3 f ou didn't answer the telephone a while ago?" This dreadful question was asked of a 
very little girl in a very big blue pinafore who came slowly into the room and looked straight at her mother in a 
most surprised manner. The sharp little face had a frown and a strained expression on it which was pitiful in such 
a little girl. 

"Why, mother, I didn't know the telephone rang! I — " 

" No, don't say another word. 1 should think you would be ashamed to talk anyhow, after you'd been so 
naughty. You used to be a real well-behaved child but now there's no managing of you. And at one time you were 
so fond of school, but I just wish you'd read that note." 

My Dear Mrs. D.— 

It has become my painful duty to write you in regard to your little daughter's behavior at school. She used 
to be one of my best scholars, but of late she pays less and less attention to what is said in school, and yesterday she 
deliberately walked off without saying a word when I called her. I can not find out what is the cause of this change 
so have resorted to your help. Hoping that it will not cause you any trouble, 

I remain as ever, JANE T. 

When Dolly Martha had finished her mother began again. 

"Now, Dolly Martha if any more of this thing happens, I'll either tell Santa Clausnot to bring you that doll, 
or I'll show father this note. Christmas '11 be here next month you know, and so will father." 

Now if there were too things in this world that Dolly Martha loved they were her father and a doll that could 
talk, and the proudest moment of her life was to be on next Christmas day when she could tell him that she had been 
so good that Santa had brought her that long desired talking doll. 

" And if mother showed him !" it was too dreadful to think about. 

Dolly Martha's father worked hard on a train very far off, and only came home once in a great while. But 
when he did, oh my, what good times they did have ! 

That night when Dolly Martha went to bed, this is the prayer that the Lord heard : 

" Oh Lord, please send one of your good angels to tell me what makes me so naughty becau se really and truly 
I don't know. And — and please let the angel show me how to be good. Amen." 

101 



After this Dolly Martha tried very hard to be good but somehow time went by so fast and before she knew it 
Christmas had come and she had not been able to do a bit better. Her father came that night but she did not enjoy 
him as much as usual because her poor little heart was too sore to enjoy anything much then. " Had mother told 
Santa Claus, or was she going to tell father? If she told father, what would he think?" These were the thoughts 
which kept worrying her little brain. 

At last Christmas morning dawned bright and early and the first thing that Dolly Martha saw was a be--au- 
tiful doll ! 

"Oil "h," she cried, picking it up and hugging it tight. "But,'' and the little face fell, " why don't 

she talk?" 

Although the doll was talking the usual doll-talk, Dolly Martha's face had such a look of disappointment as 
was pitiful to see. 

Outside the door stood someone watching, and as he watched an expression of the utmost sadness came over 
his face. 

"Little doll, why don't you talk?" Dolly Martha was saying. "Don't be afraid to, 'cause I know you've 
been a good little doll. When you lived with Santa you always answered the telephone and the door bell, and you 
never were rude to your teacher, were you? If I were you, 1 wouldn't be a bit afraid to talk." Just then Dolly 
.Martha looked up and saw her father standing in the door. The tears were in his eyes and his face was, oh so solemn ! 

" — o — oh ! " thought Dolly Martha " mother's told him." Then the little head was buried in a pillow. 

" Why what can a body be crying about on Christmas morning?" said the kindest voice in the world. 

" C — cause," came from the depths of the pillo'w, " m-m-mother's told you !" 

"Told me what? That I've got to take my little girl off to a big city and have her dolly's voice treated? " 

" But she hasn't got any voice." The face emerged from the pillow. 

"Oh, 3'es she has, you put her right next to your ear and see." 

" Ye-es, she has, but," and the little face lost some of its delighted expression, " didn't mother tell you any- 
thing else?" 

" I believe she did tell me I must get a big doctor to make my little girl hear better." 

That night the Lord heard a second prayer and it was this : 

" Oh, Lord ! your angel forgot to tell me what made me bad, but mother says I am good now, so its all right. 
Please give all the good little girls dolls like mine, and don't let me get bad any more. Amen." 

L. T. '05. 



Life Light 



In the hush of the shadowy twilight 

The day has fallen asleep, 
And the silver sun of a summer night 
Is rising her vigil to keep. 

The weary world, lying dark below, 

She touches with tender caress. 
And each deep scar of grief or woe 

She wraps in a moonlight tress. 

She kisses away the tear stains of day, 
She exiles each shadow unfurled, 

And with outspread arms of white moon-ray 
She blesses the whole wide world. 

As the moonbeams are to this poor old earth, 

So is thy love to me. 
My days on earth were nothing worth 

Till, my Heart's Light, I found thee. 

— E. B. M. '04. 



The Hourly World 

May 3404, A. D. 

I feel that in laying before the public this little work I am unearthing a fact more interesting than the latest 
discoveries of science or history. In short I have come into the possession of some scraps of manuscript written far 
back in the dark ages of the early nineteen hundreds. They are written in the manner of the ancients on a sub- 
stance known as " paper" with an oddly shaped instrument dipped into a black fluid. Of course these partly civilized 
people were ignorant of the autographic machine as we have it now. 

Unfortunately we do not know the author of these papers which seem to be a " diary" of a girl who, having 
left her home, with about a hundred others of her kind, took up her abode in some buildings situated in what she 
calls a " grove," (this word has since disappeared from our language). As far as I can ascertain this establishment 
seemed to be for the pleasure and amusement of its inhabitors, who were at times strangely subject to an epidemic of 
some sickness when they had a strange desire to see their families. Why they didn't put on their wings and fly 
wherever they wanted to go I can not discern, but of course they knew nothing of wings in that unenlightened age. 
Indeed history tells us that their only means of locomotion was by using wooden cars on wheels and these clumsy 
trains were often as much as fifteen minutes late. What would happen to-day if our world-belt flying ship should 
come in half a second behind time ? 

In this " diary" so much has been torn out and so much faded by time that only a few complete sentences are 
legible but these are fraught with interest. The first entry is dated "January 1904. I have been studying awfully 
hard for exams, and as for practise — why I fairly dream of scales at one hundred." It would appear that "scales at 
one hundred" must have been some beautiful composition for an ancient instrument called the pianoforte. People 
used to spend life time learning to make this play with their own fingers instead of our much simpler up-to-date 
method of letting every instrument play itself. 

The diary continues : "Went down town with some of the girls and bought some little cakes to keep us from 
starving." This passage is especially full of interest to those interested in Ancient Geography. I can find no spot 
by the name of " Down Town" but with the aid of the world's most learned professors on the Ancients I have decided 
it must have been situated in the part of the universe then known as France. Now with their slow modes of loco- 
motion, it must have taken them at least two weeks to reach this " Down Town" from America, yet from the casual 
mention it receives we judge that it was in no wise out of the ordinary, Then too we have evidence of a great and 
terrible famine, curiously enough unmentioned in history. Imagine for yourself the terrific state of the world, when 
after a journey of two weeks, all these girls could procure 1o prevent death from hunger was a few small cakes. It 
would draw tears to our eyes — if we had not discovered that crying is very unscientific and unhealthy. 



104 



This wonderful paper continues: "We are all wildly excited about the Muse. The Editors say it is going to 
be better this year than it ever has been before." This Muse was evidently a yearly published by all America or at 
least that part of it known then as the " United States." The writer has great admiration for the forementioned Edi- 
tors for on the next line the only legible words are, "Wish 1 smart Editors grand!" And I must 

acknowledge that this work has not a style which in our enlightened age would be considered charming or flowing, 
but at least it has the virtues of simplicity and conciseness. 

" Had a German — " (here a word is evidently left out) — the author does not say whether it was a German 
man, woman, or what — " last night. The grandest two-step." We find in the dictionary that a two-step was a wild 
sort of war dance very popular among the ancients, when two people put their arms around each other and gave sun- 
drey hops and skips in time to the pianoforte. It must have been an interesting and imposing sight when as many 
as six couples at a time would be hopping and running around to the great peril of their toes and sometimes of 
their lives. 

The next entry is only a fragment on the last page dated " May 29th. School is really over andhow I hate 
to tell the girls good bye. It nearly breaks my heart to leave my room-mate." This last word is the onl}' one in the 
manuscript whose meaning has been absolutely forgotten. Of course we know what room, is but mate ! After due 
consideration it has been decided that mate is derived from the same root as mat and must mean the same. We have 
door mat, so later in the gradual change of language room mate dropped the final " e" and became room mat — or a 
covering to be spread over the floor. It seems very strange that this girl should have been so devoted to her room 
mat, but perhaps it was a particular costly or handsome one. 

And this is all that is extant of the wonderful manuscript which throws so much light on that primitive age 
of phonographs and electric lights. 

M. E, Du. B. '05. 



<~TX 




Vineta 



(There is a legend that the ancient city of Viueta lies buried in the Baltic Sea, betweenthe island of Kugen and the mainland.) 

Evening bolls arc strangely, softly sounding In my heart of hearts there sounds a music 
'Xeath the cool green surging of the sea, Like the haunting story of the bells ■ 

Singing of that ancient wonder-city, Sweet, ah! sweet the purport of its singing — 
Whispering an untold mystery. Of the love that dwelleth there it tells. 

Far below the bosom of the waters And my heart, it is a heavenly city; 

Still her straight and stately towers rise, Strange and lovely towers deck its ways. 

Which reflect the radiant sunset's glory — Tn the mirror of my dreams I see them, 

I.o ! the sight is seen of mortal eyes. Golden in the glory of love's rays. 

And a fisher, who has seen the glory, Ah, city of my dreams, like old Vineta, 
Seen it when the evening clouds are red, Bind me, hold me in thy charmed spell, 

O'er Vineta he must fish forever, For never angels sang a sweeter story 
Fish, tliouffh tempests gather over head. Than the tales thy harmonies foretell. 

Translated from the German of Muller; by M. H., 'M. 



A Warm Welcome 

DRAMATIS PERSON/E 

Miriam Rivers .... An old girl who has come back late in the term. 

Grace Brown Her room-mate 

Isabel Evans A friend. 

Marion Keys .... Another friend 

Other School Girls. 

Scene — A room in S — r H — 1. Miriam — Let's go and get acquainted with her. 

Miriam, who has just arrived, is sitting on the hed with Miriam — Xo, you'd better not; she's awfully reserved 

her wraps and furs on. Around her are seated her friends, and proper. 

who are lovingly watching' her and the box of Huyler's she Isabel (inspired) — Then let's haze her! 

is opening. .1// — Grand! 

Miriam — Oh, girls, 1 came up on the train with the (Two girls rush over to the vacant room, the others get 

cutcsl thing you ever saw. She's a new girl who's coming a large piece of paper and print on it. ) 
here. Isabel — There — these rules for her benefit are something 

Isabel — Then she must be going to stay in the vacant handsome. (Reads from the paper.) 
room on our hall. 

Qrace (skillfully extracting Miriam's lunch from her 
su i( C ase) What's her name? When a member of the faculty speaks to you, curtsy 

Miriam— I forgot to ask her. How utterly stupid I am. immediately. Invariably address a Senior by the title Miss. 

But any way, she's perfectly darling. (Looking out of During meditation hour on Sunday, think over your sins of 

the window. ) There she goes now. tne l' asl ' week ; if repentant, answer " rep " at evening roll- 

llran — She certainly is pretty from a back view. ral1 ; >f uot - answer "non-rep." To take more than one 

107 



liiscuii at breakfast is considered a breach of etiquette, 
punishable by five disorders. (The girls laugh.) There! 
that ought to impress her. (She goes out to hang the 
placard in the varanl room. The three girls come back.) 

Marion — We've made her a pie bed, and hidden her 
bureau keys, and the rules look stunning. 

Grace — I'll attend to sewing up her coat sleeves as soon 



Grace — Prettv thick with the faculty already. 

(Miss Andrew's voice from the hall: " Miss Halsey, let 
me introduce Miss Stone, our new Greek teacher, you 
know, who was detained by her mother's illness.") 

(Miss Halsey is seen shaking the "new girl's" hand. 
They walk into the vacant room. ) 

(Isabel collapses into a chair like a jack knife, Grace 
leans limply against the wall and tears her hair, Miriam 



as I can get hold of the garment. 

Miriam ( looking through the door ) — llusli ! There she rolls on the bed in hysterical giggles.) 
comes with Miss Andrews and .Miss Halsey. Curtain. 



M. H. '04. 



Kitty 0. (studying for English examination). — Was Christianity introduced into England in 500 A. D. 
or B. ( !. '. 

Dorothy S. — Mildred, you are a regular Puck. 

Mildred K. — I am sorry. Dot, but I don't consider you any Judge. 

A I the Thanksgiving Banquet — 

Minnie B. and Ann G. (indignantly). — Why, ire didn't order chicken soup — we ordered cream of chicken. 

Mary Jtnth T. (during a discussion of different school tires). — Eire bugs? What sort of spiders are they? 

Mr. Stone (trying to explain the meaning of "swain"). — Jfow, if a milkmaid were on one side of the fence. 
what would he on the other '. 

Emma B. (excitedly). — The cow. 

One of the flirts (looking out of window at burning shanty a mile or so away). — Come quick, you can see the 
Baltimore fire from our window. 

Marguerite 8. (earnestly). — Do you really think it's Baltimore? 




AMONG 

OURSELVES 



The Calendar 




homesick. . 
formed, the 
commenced 



z'imi we we 
never forget 



SEPTEMBER 

On the 17th of September, St. Mary's re-opened and on the whole we all returned very promptly. 
There is no month in the school year busier than September. There were all the new teachers to be 
met — to say nothing of the crowd of the more or less homesick " new girls," whom we had to be nice 
to, remembering the time when we too were strangers. Then also there were our desolate looking 
rooms or alcoves waiting to be transformed into comfortable little dens. At this time a casual pas- 
serby might have thought a house was being built, for St. Mary's echoed and re-echoed with the sound 
of hammering. It was on the 26th of this month that the old girls of the 2. A. welcomed the new 
members with a delightful reception in the Far Country. 

In those first days of school the Seniors tried hard to be dignified and imposing; the Juniors made 
a brave effort not to appear too elated over being Juniors ; the Soph's struggled not to show their con- 
tempt for the Fresh, and the poor little Freshmen — well, they just did their best not to get too 
\.fter awhile, however, the rooms were arranged, new friendships were 
studies we had been looking forward to with such dread all summer were 
and found not to be so dreadful after all, and before we realized it, it was 

OCTOBER 
October was full of events — some of them, like the 
Tau Delta German on the Kith, quite society affairs. 
This first german of the year was a decided success. Of 
course the prettiest sort of figures were led and the little 
Japanese maids who passed around refreshments were 
most attractive. 

On the 12th the Masonic Fair opened down town 
and every evening during the rest of that week, oblig- 
ing chaperons took down enthusiastic crowds of girls. 
The next week the Great State Fair came, and on the 
re given a, holiday so that we might all go to see the sights. We'll 
how tired we werethat night, or what a good time we had during the day. 





MAKE niVES£H!9*)W 
THEMSELVES :\yiAjEiA 
K.M.C OFTHE awt anyic> 



FVHD THEFIC THEy WILL RECREATE THEMSELVES WITH 
SEUEfc.V.Lff\E |T |CE A*E T^F WtftS) 

FT- C _.M. 



»yc 



But October reached its climax on the very last night of all — Hallowe'en. Of course we had our usual fancy 
dress dance, and never have the costumes been better, the Sybils' jokes and local hits funnier, or the fortunes pre- 
dicted for us by all sorts of ingenious methods brighter. In short, thanks to Miss Checkley, Mr. DuBose, Mrs. Jenkins 
and all the other teachers who entered so heartily into our fun, the whole evening could not have been more delight- 
ful, and it formed a fitting close to this happy month. 

NOVEMBER 

opened with a holiday — " All Saint's" and our " Founder's Day," when our little chapel 
w r as fairly ablaze with chrysanthemums and autumn leaves. When one says Novem- 
ber, one naturally thinks of Thanksgiving. To be sure we had only Thanksgiving 
Day, itself, for a holiday, in spite of our wild hopes that Friday also would be given 
us, but to the Seniors at least, the "26th was a red letter night, for then Eliza Brown 
started our series of Senior entertainments with a regular Thanksgiving dinner at the 
Yarborough House. 

While we were down town the girls at school had not been idle for on our re- 
turn we found the old parlor turned into a regular " Midway" and crowded with teach- 
ers, girls and visitors — St. Etheklreda's Chapter was giving a fair. 

St. Etheldreda was not the only chapter active in November ; the St. Monica 
girls on the 7th gave a Dutch evening and on the 21st the St. Elizabeth girls invited 
us, and our money, to the Old Maid's Convention. 

On the 10th the Basket Ball Association was organized. The Etoiles gave an- 
other delightful german on the 14th, and on the 24th the Literary Societies, to show 
that they were not extinct, gave to the school world the first number of " St. Mary's Peals." Crude and full of faults 
it certainly was, but please remember it was the first attempt. During the last days of November, big boxes and lit- 
tle boxes of all shapes and sizes were piled up before the front door and poor Miss Ann was nearly driven crazy by 
inquisitive girls. I think everybody must have gotten at least one box from the number the expressman delivered. 
And so with our hearts full of Thanksgiving we welcomed 



COMINqi 






DEU 






TCH 






EL. 






ABE 
















flgffBgj 


Ml. 




y?j^^ui 


It.(? 




<fe|p^j 


i 


y^gm 




3- 




coMmCf j 

OPEN 





DECEMBER 
The' first event in December was on the .3th, when " An Open Secret," a little college 
play, was presented by the girls of St. Catherine's Chapter. 

Margaret Stedman and Lucy Redwood gave the Seniors their second treat on the 
7th, and on the 12th its new members who had patiently waited and who had made the 
required average in their studies were informally entertained by the E. A. II. And on the 
1 1 th Miss Glenn Priest gave a recital at St. Mary's which we thoroughly enjoyed. 

But the night in December that stands out most vividly is the 17th when the Faculty 
demonstrated that in histrionic talent we girls would have to yield the palm to them. " Alice 
in Wonderland" could not have been improved upon. If we were to tell St. Mary's girls 
of a year or two ago that dignified Miss Thomas was nothing more nor less than a "White Rabbit" and that Miss 
Checkley actually danced a clog dance, they would think we had gone crazy, and yet it did happen ! On the 18th, 
the morning after the play, joyfully bidding each other Merry Christmas, we separated for the Christmas holidays. 

JANUARY 

We had an unusually long holiday this year as school did not re-open 
until the 5th. January is always a little bit dreary, for everbody did have 
such a good time Christmas and once back at school, there seems nothing to 
look forward to but the Mid Year Exams. Yet even in January some pleas- 
ant things happen. On the Kith the Juniors entertained the Seniors delight- 
fully. And no later than the very next Monday, the Seniors were given an- 
other good time, when Isabel Brumby, Kitty Coleman and Minnie Burgwyn 
gave their enjoyable little At Home. The missionary spirit flared up again among us when St. Margaret's Chapter 
gave its Japanese tea on the 16th. On the '21st the dreaded examinations began. There were no exemptions at all 
this year and for several days every girl you saw had her arms loaded with books and a hunted expression on her 
face. Fortunately we all pulled through that trying time and on the whole we think we did very creditably. 

One of the nicest things that happened in January was Edward Baxter Perrj' on the 25th. Every year Mr. 
Perry finds at St. Mary's a most enthusiastic audience. He was followed on the 30th by Miss Benedict, who gave us 
another lecture recital. It was by accident that Miss Benedict visited us having arranged at first to go to Oxford, 
but although we are sorry for the Oxford people we are sure that they could not have enjoyed having her any more 
than we did. 



NUARY« 





s8th Lily Skinner entertained 



FEBRUARY 
The first part of this month will always he remembered by the Seniors, at 
least. The very first night of February, Bessie Massey invited both the Seniors 
of the A. & M. and St. Mary's to a Progressive Sniff Party. None of us knew 
what to expect, but after all Sniff turned out to be very little different from domi- 
noes, which, of course we knew. 

Margaret. Herbert's "Library Party" followed on the 6th when we all went 
as books. " The ( 'avaher" was seen to flirt desperately " With Edged Tools," and 
''Lavender and Old Lace" made a pretty contrast with "In Black and White." Onth 
us and as a souvenir of the occasion we each received a dainty little collarette worked in our class colors. On the 
13th the Senior French class gave the little farce " Les Cuisinieres" which was thoroughly enjoyed even though — - 
perhaps — not thoroughly understood. Ann Giff'ord's Valentine Party was on the 15th, and on 
the 17th Lent commenced, Ash Wednesday being a holiday as usual. 

Of course after Lent began no more social events happened in February and our studies 
went on in the even tenor of their way until at last we came to 



everything at St- 
Lenten charitable 




MARCH 
The entire month of March was in the Lenten season, so naturally 
Mary's was very quiet. But filled as it was with hard studying and our 
work March passed quite quickly enough and in the end came Easter. 

APRIL 
The first days of April were given up to Easter rejoicing and we entered on the last term of 
school with light hearts. After their Lenten sleep the different clubs and organizations sprang into 
new life. The Dramatic Club presented its long looked forward to play and the Literary Societies 
met and grappled with each other in their Inter-Society debate. 

The Sororities, too, became prominent. On the evening of the 5th the Phi Delta's gave a 
dinner at Giersch's followed by a theatre party and in the middle of April came the Alpha 
Kappa Psi banquet. 

The Seniors meanwhile continued their entertainments with unabated zeal. And after 
Easter, how we did dance ! We were never too tired or too hot for it in the evening — and I 



we 

must not forget the Subscription Dance 
rushed to their hearts content. 

Muwe 15 



the St. Mary's "men" gave — when the 



all 




But April finally ended and we turned to welcome 



^W« 




MAY— AT LAST 

Commencement month ! Every one knows what that means to a school 
girl ! Just before school closes- we know we ought to study harder than ever, but 
I am afraid we don't often do it. In May the grove is so beautiful that the 
impulse just to sit out of doors and dream about what we'll do when we really 
finish school is irresistible. 

Baccalaureate Sunday came on the 22nd this year and to our great 
joy Bishop Bratton preached our Baccalaureate sermon. Monday and Wed- 
nesday evenings of the following week were given over to the music pupils 
who proved conclusively that all the weary practicing on commencement 
solos, duets, trios and quartets had not been in vain. On Tuesday evening 
the Seniors made their very first bow to society at their class reception. In 
our very prettiest evening dresses we stood beside Mrs. DuBose in the big 
parlor and gravely shook hands with every one presented to us from the 
Trustees down to our own room-mates, who did their best to look as if they 
were in awe of us. During the commencement week the Gamma Beta 
Sigmas gave their annual banquet. 

School formally ended and the Senior Class was graduated mi Thurs- 
day, May 26th. What a day it was to be sure ! St. Mary's grove was filled 
to overflowing with visitors and girls in dainty white dresses. And such a 
wealth of flowers ! Can we ever forget the excitement of that morning, how 
proud we felt when we were given our diplomas, ami how very, very hard 
we tried not to cry during the valedictory. And then the afternoon when 
every hall is filled with trunks strapped and ready to go, when your voice 
echoes in your room whose Avails are bare now of all but tack holes, when 
every minute another carriage load of girls rolls off — girls you never will see 
again — but why dwell on it '.' 

The school 3'ear with its work and its play, its joy and its sorrow, is 
over now, so with smiles on our lips but with tears in our eyes we bid good- 
live in St. Mary's. 



The Lavender Maid 

Two girls paid a visit to St. Mary's the other day, and one of them was striking enough to attract attention. 
She wore a dress of quaint, flowered muslin, her hair was drawn back smoothly over her ears, and there was a faint 
odor of lavender about her as she walked. She was the spirit of a St. Mary's girl of fifty years ago, come back to 
visit her old haunts. Her companion was distinctly modern ; the sleeves of her shirt waist were rolled up to her 
elbows, and she wore what appeared, at a rough estimate, to be about fifteen society pins. I am sure you recognize 
her as a St. Mary's girl of to-da3 r . 

The two went first to the West Rock House, and choosing the better part, remained on the first floor. Sounds 
of wrangling were heard to issue from the Hughsons' room. "Sisters, merely," said the modern girl, in answer to 
her companion's look of pained inquiry. 

They went into the long room filled with little white beds which is known as Miss Katie's Dorn. "This," 
said the modern girl impressively, "is called the Flower Garden of St. Mary's." From the alcove nearest the door a 
small, short-skirted figure bounded forth. " Speaking of ghosts, wi-erd," she said, as she saw the lavender maid. 
" Rather forward for so young a child," murmured the shade. 

" Sa-ad !" drawled Sue Prince, superciliously, 

(Turn off that water down stairs.) 

The rather tense silence which followed this remark was broken by the strains of a lively ditty coming from 
Minnie Beebe's alcove, the only distinguishable words being, "Let the women do the work, clothe work, do the 
work — " 

" A surprising, but praiseworthy sentiment," approved the lavender maid. 

The pretty ghost laid her hand on the head of a flaxen-haired, meek-eyed girl who was standing near her. 
"You, dear," she said," remind me of my school-mates. I hope you cultivate the old-fashioned virtues of — " 

Fannie Williams looked up in surprise. " Oh, shut your mouth, won't you ? " she chuckled. 

The lavender maid drew back her hand in dismay. " Is everything changed? " she cried. 

( Will you. turn the water off down there"! ) 

Bland Bowen was curled up in the dormitory rocking chair in such a way that only her legs and black head 
were visible. The modern girl pointed her out. " There," she said," is the Great Child Student of North America." 

Bland looked up. " Don't interrupt me" she muttered, " I have eighteen lessons to study for to-morrow." 

115 



The modern girl drew back the curtain of a pretty alcove. "This is where Josie Knowles stays" she said. 
"She is absolutely unique, the only one of her kind." 

Josie looked out, smiling, " Compliments, whe-ew ! " she whistled. 

"Miss Katie," .Serena Bailey called. " I got into bed two and two-thirds seconds after the bell rang last night. 
Shall I give in a punctuality?" Even the lavender maid looks surprised. At this moment a tall fair-haired girl 
rushed madly by, passing right through the lavender maid in her haste. 

" Is she having fits? " inquired the ghost, collecting herself with an effort. "Oh, no, it's only Rebecca Cush- 
man, and she has heard that her Ladies' Home Journal has come," explained the modern girl. 

They had finished their visit, and as they went out, the same strange wail sounded. 

" Will you please turn off the water." 

" What can that noise be?" inquired the lavender maid. "I believe," her escort explained, " that s:me peo- 
ple live upstairs, and the}' spend their time bathing in large pools of water collected at the expense of an entire 
drought down here." 

The nerves of the lavender maid had been considerably jarred, and it was in rather a bitter tone of voice that 
she remarked as they went out, "Well, if this is the Flower garden of St. Marv's, I must saj 7 I pitv the back vard !" 

UPSILON DELTA. 



Miss Thomas (after having explained how to get at meaning of words from their derivation). — What is rebeck? 
Bright Scholar. — To call again. 

Mile. — Xow, Xan, what would you call a man who brieves everything he hears? [Answer, a credulous man.] 
Nan 8. (innocently). — A goose. 

Miss Chechley (in history). — Tell me something of Constantinople in the ninth century. 
Courtney W. — Well, it had paved streets and — electric lights. 

Nancy B. — They don't serenade here like they do in Georgia. A fine quartette used to serenade me: John 
Hill and — oh ! lots of other fellows. 

Why do Ohla, Dot, Virgilia and Lucy refuse to speak aboui the night of the " blacking"? 

Aunt Louisa (after a violin recital). — Did the youni lady play in French, Ma'am? 



The Midnight Adventure of Two Roof- Walkers 



Picture last night, 

Two Seniors slim and slight, 

In kimonas, gowns and slippers — nothing more ; 
On the tin roof as they stepped, 
Such a clatter as they kept, 

As was never at St. Mary's heard before. 



But the moon was shining bright, 
And displayed to all the sight, 

Teachers being no exception to the case. 
To the office they were called, 
Over the fire and coals were haided, 

Till of former courage there was left no trace. 



Down the slate roof they did slide, 
On the tin roof they did stride — 

What a racket all the listeners' ears did greet ! 
Soon o'er the peak they sped, 
Up the fire-escape they fled, 

To receive congratulations for the feat. 



They had their fun that night, 
But their honor they did blight, 

And they never can be trusted any more. 
Though pathetic 'tis to say, 
In tliis grove they'll have to stay 

'Till a month of deep repentance passes o'er. 



So picture to-day 

Two girls forlorn, I pray, 

And never on a tin roof dare to climb ; 
For your honor you will lose, 
And you're sure to have the blues, 

As the lectures you will get are not sublime. 



A Night in the West Rock 

The seven-thirty bell had rung and the girls were getting settled for the evening study-Hour. The West Eock 
girls, who were so fortunate as to "skip" study-hall successfully, returned to their respective rooms, headed by Ida, 
singing " Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand." For an entire hour the floor was quiet and the girls were appa- 
rently hard at work. The stillness was broken by Mattie Jones, who always had something very important to tell. 
In the meantime the commotion in the hall caused Nell to think that there was a feast going on, and in order that 
she might not be left out, she strolled into Jennie's room ; after looking at the clock for five minutes, she asked in 
her usual calm manner, " Do you care if I see what time it is ? " It is well that " faithful Jenny M." didn't object, 
for Nell had already seen the time. 

In a minute a loud crash was heard, followed by the splash of water, and a familiar voice yelling out, " Will 
you kindly be so pleasant as to turn off the water downstairs ? " Rushing out to discover the trouble, we saw Susan 
standing by the spout gripping her pitcher handle tightly, while the bits of pitcher lay scattered on the floor in 
front of her. One by one the girls gathered in the hall for their usual " rough-house," which always took place 
when Miss Jones went down town. This was opened by a heated discussion between Ida and Susan as to the 
courtesy of Ida's leaving the practice-room door open in Miss Massey's face and the justice of being reported for 
it. After a dispute of some length, Mattie Jones closed the argument in Susan's favor, and Ida, exhausted from the 
discussion and her usual hunger, piped meekly : " I always did feel strange here — now I know where I belong. 
Heaven is my home." Her feeble( ?) voice died away amid the notes of a guitar, for 'twas time for the West Eock 
glee club to meet. After several favorite coon songs, Mary St. John aniused the crowd with a " cake-walk," while 
Mattie Hunter and Mamie Eossell were engaged in a sleight-of-hand performance, which consisted in letting a broom 
down through the transom on sleeping Elizabeth's head. 

At this point the ten-o'clock bell rang, and the lights in the upper end of the hall were out and " the dots " 

118 



went to sleep. Not so with the " five West Rockers " who alone deemed themselves worthy of the appellation ; for 
they were huddled together in niic room, and by the dim light of a candle were continuing their usual occupations. 
Mildred, inspired by " a certain photograph " on the table in front of her, was completing her nightly epistle, 
while Sumter was completing her's also. Evelyn and Minna were banging eagerly over a smoking sauce-pan, but 
not even the excitement, of fudge caused Christine to put aside her hem-stitching. The stillness was first broken 
by Evelyn — " I know it is not done — I've made it loads of times before, and it's entirely too thin." "Well, I guess 
I've made it, too, and as good as you ever dared do," said Minna. A foot-fall was heard on the stairs, the light 
was quickly extinguished, and each girl stole quietly back to her bed. 



Lucy K. (at rehearsal of play). — I can't speak that side remark so loud, Esther; the other girls on the stage 
will hear me. 

Mr. D)iH<>.«> (at roll call). — llevward, L. 

Present. 

Mr. Du Bose. — Iiey ward, ('. 

No answer. 

(Again) llevward, < '. 

(Surprised) Is Miss llevward, C, sick '. 

Marguerite S. — I should think it would be a regular cinch to be on the Altar Guild. Why, you can go to the 
woods whenever vou want to. 




KITTY COLEMAN, 
Most Popular. 




MARGARET HERBERT. 
Most Studious. 





MARY BEVERLY DIXON. 
Best Dancer. 




MILDRED DRANSFIELD TILTON. 
Most Accomplished. 



LILLIAN HA1GH. 
Cutest. 




roi 

evei 




MARGARE1 _ONN0R. 

Mo . 





JENNIE ATKINSON MUKCHISON. 
Mosl Energetic, 






■ . RED' 3 DMUNDS, 

... ■ i ■ i 



LUC\ 1 -W ■ '-' ■ 
Handsi rrn 




- COLEMAN. 

■ ■ ■ 




. i dious. 





■ 




; i.i FIELD T1LTON. 



Cutea 




MARJORIE HUGHSON, 
Cleverest. 




MARGARET CONNOR, 
Most Stylish. 





JENNIE ATKINSON MURCH1SON, 
Most Energetic. 




MILDRED EDMUNDS. 
Jolliest. 



LUCY TAYLOR REDWOOD, 
Handsomest. 




LEIZE HOLMES WEAVER. 
Prettiest. 





ANN K1MBERLY GIFFORD, 
Most Courteous. 




MARY BOLLING STURGEON, 
Most Athletic. 



SARAH JONES. 

Most Attractive. 



Monday Morning Echoes from the " Last Resort." 

Uowen'i Dormitory. 

Slatl /.—Do you reckon anyl "1 ill «ii I ; hai ' ' ; "' !l «"ff s loudh downstairs.) 

,] Imii oin tin iviucl Ni ; All— Why, that's lunch! 

Frances Irm i lew you. drop il „ Mildred Edn rfs— Sarah, are you going to ; 

, Sam/i ./onej (from alcove) — > T ", love, 1 don't think so. 

H/any Burt Thm m u - i ■■<-' L , . , • 

( ■' 1 have jiwi | o ii> hi;, hair. 

Margaret Herbert (catching Margaret Smith before b 

Marnaret Herbert — Oin '■ i - ■" in ■ itnev, . , -, , , ci m 

•' ■'" leaves the dornnton I — Margaret Smith, can you give me 

'■ " Rllth - » ilm i ■ fi .' r ■! apter dues? 

ulh Fostei (interruptiiiiO [itsi , nd nn a Margaret Sm/tft— Good gracious, child! whai does 

i! pin. motie-s lool like: 

ie-Fosti 1 can't, llnth ; I r doj i ay- Ella.Croft — I I i «Iis Bowen doesi speet on Mon- 

liin: t« wear myself! Jays— as usual, my shi :l fell down this morning. 

///, :i , /;. ( e plaining lln difference betu n jori , \Iaiy &ivoii'x voice (floating hack from the hall)—] 

., plurality oi 1 otes I — ' si - ■ i ' ; really think my necl fattei than it u as last uight. 

k . get a majority, and th so thai jusr ,s H ^t the (R; degrees rli donuifori is mptied. The footsteps 

i i sv ," and ■ oid - . n fa ■■ tntl Pa n.ti and at lasl I ■ 

ileteb ay.) 




'. T.AVER, 

■ 





\NN K'IMBERLV GIF] 
M ost 




r -i . . : i Athli ti :. 



■ 

- ■ . ■ 



Monday Morning Echoes from the " Last Resort." 

Scene: Miss Bowen's Dormitory. 

Slade -/. — I'" you reckon anybody will care if I hang (A bell rings Loudly downstairs.) 

my hair out the window to dry it 1 All — Why, that's lunch! 

Frances Broadfoot — No, not unless you drop it. Mildred Edmunds — Sarah, are you going to get there? 

1f n n r rl -ir . mi > + . t Sarah Jours (fviini alcove) — ~So, love, I don't think so. 
Mary Kiitli 1 nomas — Margaret Urbert, w at must 1 

, ' I have iust cot to fix my hair, 

wear '. . . ' . 

nr , TI -i . ,-. ■ , , • ,, Margaret Herbert (catching Margaret Sniitli before she 

Margaret Herbert — Une is about as becoming as anotlier, ■' . 

lr -p. ,, leaves the dormitory) — Margaret Smith, can von give me 

Mary Kutb. . 

the money for your chapter dues? 

Butli Foster (interrupting) — Kitsie, please lend me a l; , .. ,; n , ■ i -i i i i * i 

1 ' Margaret Smith — wood gracious, child! what does 

llat -P in - money look like? 

Kitsie Foster— 1 can't, Kuth ; if I do 1 won't have any- E ,) (l Cmft _r hope Miss B , nv ,, n ,,,„.,„•, i]ls]1( „. t on Moll . 

thing to wear myself ! ,lays— as usual, nxy shelf fell down this morning. 

Eliza B. (explaining the difference between a majority Mary Dixon's mice (floating back from the hall) — I 

and a plurality of votes) — "Those who get a two-thirds really think my neck is fatter than it was last night, 
vote get a majority, and those that just act the most get the (By degrees the dormitory is emptied. The footsteps 

pleurisy." and voices grow fainter and fainter and at last the echoes 

die completely away.) 



A True Episode 



Responsive to the ringing of the eleven-o'clock bell, one morning in February, a small troop of Sophomores went 
down the covered way inwards the Latin room. Many a time had this same procession passed, gay and giggling, 
but this morning — what cruel decree of an adverse Fate has plunged a dozen girls, with one fell stroke, into mourn- 
ing and woe '. 

In solemn single hie they move slowly along, with bowed heads and clothed in somber black. They go meekly 
through the door of the recitation-room and take their places in sorrowing silence, broken only by an occasional 
sharp indrawn breath which sounds dangerously like a soli. 

The Virgils are opened at the Fourth Book, and as the lesson proceeds an overpowering wave of woe seems to 
rush over the class, apparent in the shaking shoulders and drooping heads which bend lower and lower over the open 
pages to hide a too-visible emotion, ami one or two of these miserable victims id' blighting sorrow even bury their 
distorted faces in handkerchiefs so large that the folds fall far down towards the floor. 

(Strangely, this common woe is unshared by the stem preceptor, who listens relentlessly as one recitation after 
another is wrung from the girls' trembling lips. 

0, sympathetic reader! would you know the cause of this great grief, so bravely and so painfully repressed? 
Alas!£>/rfo is dead! 



All Hallowe'en 



On IIk' eveuin. 





the thirty-firsl ol ■ iber long before half-past seven, those who had come to 
the Ha en festi ities were gathered in the parlor. The faculty 

n \n\ i St Mary's down-town friends, while a few stray 
boai li nd day scholars lined the walls between the n 
and tl ige 

lall was crowded with confusion, a mix- 
ture i gs omi strange, some weird, some beautiful, 
but a uni of the piano, the mass formed slowly 
tutt'ly p ocession; the parlor floors were thrown 
op he Grand March had begun. 

I ol the long double line — in immaculate 

well aw ire of his own irm ortance-^came 

, ■ odore Etoi i President of the ; mi ; i and with 

; m h - friend 1\ Wa hington whom hi* Excellency, Mr. 

tin assembled com] anj which he 
arveyed ritics il throug h his ■ il rimmed eye-gl 

Second in order o oam< i- Greek girl and a pious nun, then two 

toddling little J m h wed b tli \,i well ! nown pair— 

Alphonse mdG ssed but slowly on account of their 

stoppingal evei ■, ' : mdg ulato to each other. The 

o in pr< ' i made up <>fgho: fes.and > Idi coloni : me 

and Twentieth ury girls, hi vlaj : the nfi rival Regions, i 

i Gold Di the Pip] : ' n Ij and so man others thai 

a heti the m; pel ike up, the brig tl illed the room 

madi a seen i wh e ] 'senl will not easih foi gi I 

\ 




lookers at 

thei e and 





A True Episode 



lesponsivo to the ringing of the eleven-o'clock 1 mil Februa r, a small troop ■■ ^ " 

down Mi/ covered way towards the Utin r i. Many » time bail this samp prow - ieil ga; ri 

l nl this morning — what enu^l decree of an adverse Fate lias plunged ; I '.en girls, with on< fel i 

roe : 
In solemn single tile they move slowly along, with • ids- nud clo.thed in son ' lie> - 

■ .... of the recitation-room and take their places in sun-owing silence an 

shai'p : breath which sounds dangerously lik< i 

,■ \ T irgils are opened al the Fourth Bool ind proceeds an overpowering wave ai 

rush over the class, apparent in the shal ug i leads which In id lo ovei tl 

pages to hide a too-visible emotion, and one or tw< of th p l< victim oi li liting s ti bur 

, . -tod face ; .' Ini id .< rchief." so large thai th : •'■'- ; Fai : i n ■ ird: the ':■ or 

Strangely, this common woe is unshared i-;. tin stei i ■ ■■ ■ ptor. who listen? relentless] uv itai on 

.i, th i - wrung from flu -iris' i rembling lips. 

(), . : ...... would yoi I n ea grief, bravely 

las! o is 'l-.ui'. 



All Hallowe'en 



On the evening' of the thirty-first of October, long before half-past seven, those who had come to be onlookers at 

^^^ ^^^ the Hallowe'en festivities were gathered in the parlor. The faculty was there and 

Warn ^|l many of St. Mary's down-town friends, while a few stray 

^flQp ■Hr boarders ami day scholars lined the walls between them 

W77 M&' an< ^ tne sta S t '- 

^^^ fl ^^%. ^^ Outside the hall was crowded with confusion, a mix- 

4 ^1 H ■ IHBk '""' "'' '"' m S s > some strange, some weird, some beautiful, 

fl ^L but at the sound of the piano, the mass formed slowly 

fl A into a stately procession ; the parlor doors were thrown 

IB tW 'open, and the Grand March had begun. 

At the head of the long double line — in immaculate 
collar and vest, and well aware of his own importance — came 
Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, and with, 
him his friend, Booker T. Washington, whom his Excellency, Mr. 
Roosevelt, introduced to the assembled company, which he 
surveyed critically, meanwhile, through his gold-rimmed ej'e-glasses. 
Second in order of march came a Greek girl and a pious nun, then two 
toddling little Japs, and they were followed by that well known pair — 
Alphonse and Gaston — who progressed but slowly on account of their 
stopping at every few steps to bow and gesticulate to each other. The 
rest of the procession was made up of ghosts and children, colonial dames 
and Twentieth Century girls, his Majesty of the Infernal Regions, the 
Latest Gold Dust Twins, the Pipp family, and so many others that 
when the march broke up, the bright throng that filled the room 
made a scene which those who were present will not easily forget. 





" Before' 
would-be 
Senior," 



J 11 the second number of the All Hallow- 
e'en programme, before advantage was 
taken of this propitious evening to attempt 
lifting the veil of the future, the Present was 
given its place, and during the reading of the 
Sybil's scroll by that dread personage herself, 
there were many who caught, fir once, just 
a glimpse of themselves as others see them, 
and "After," two scenes in the life of a St. Mary's girl, followed, showing the 





'• Saint " as she learns a thing or two 
and as she appears later — the victim 

fXext, it was an- 
was open to all who 
Future had in store 
was faint-hearted 
.Midway — otherwise 
soon filled with bold 
wlio did not hesitate 
tent to the scarlet- 
'A \ and from there to the 

[\ burning altars, and 

gypsy, stopping only 
ally on the strange 
various and varied 
of their fates. 





about St. Mary's from 
of rules and disorders, 
nounced that the Hallow 
dared to learn something 
for them, anil it seeme 
that night, for the 
the Study Hall— was 
" Fortune Hunters," 
to pass from a gypsy's 
hung Heart-Booth, 
Pythia's i n c e n s e 
then on to another 
to remark occasion- 
dissimilarity in the 
editions of the stories 




girl— a 

Midway 
hat the 
no on e 




From tin Midway, the wowd i 
turned to the parlor, where nuts cand | 
and apples were being distributed and 
the fun continued until at last it wa i 
short by the ringing of thai inevitable 
bell. Then the lights went out one b\ 
one, leaving the rooms in darkness and 
quiet, and all Hallowe'en was over — 
until next vear. 





and Ai- i ' ' 1 : les in the 
would-be " Sainl h learns a thingoi « 

g ■ ' tnd as she appears later— the < 

Next, it was an- 
was open to all n ho 
Future had in 

faint-hearted 
Michi riy — otherwise 
soon filled « ith bold 
who did nol In itate 
tent to the scarlel 
and from there to the 
burning altars, and 

allv nil llic strange 
various and ' i'iei 
of their fati •-. 



In the second number of the All Hallow- 
e'en progri ■■ h 1' 'l-i ud\ . iitage xiw. 

taki u of | • 

!g tl lie futu nt whs 

: its placi ' igthi n ading ol th< 

il's scroll ■ ■ icrself, 

ivln i ughl for nci ju - 

n glimpse of t! nsolves as others 

life oi ' •". VI r wed o ing the 

about SI VI 
of rules 
qou! i ed thai tl i Lowe' i n 




dared to leai i ometl ig i I > 

hem ad il ] 

that r the 

, I— was 
tun E-Iu 
- ■ • i ! : < ! 
hung 1 1 ; 

then "ii : 
to pen . 

11 ilarit\ 
litii - .i 



Wat the 





From the Midway, the crowd re- 
turned to the parlor, where nuts, candy 
and apples were being distributed and 
the fun continued until at last it was cut 
short by the ringing of that inevitable 
bell. Then the lights went out one by 
one, leaving the rooms in darkness and 
quiet, and all Hallowe'en was over — 
until next year. 




Mirabile Dictu!! 



September 19 (the day after sel 1 opened, and at short intervals all during the year). — There was an import- 
ant meeting of the Senior Class. 

(•(■teller 12. — Eliza Brown missed a fourth of a question in English. 

November 17. — Rosalie Bernhardt shut the door. 

December 1-1. — Society pins arrived from Desio, and there was no mistake in shape or lettering. 

January 5. — Marjorie Hughson was on time for class. 

March 11. — 8:45 to 9, strike of the music pupils. 

March 17. — Charge of the Cornstalk Brigade. 

April !•. — Mary S. received a letter from Chapel Hill with the postage prepaid. 

May 28. — V. Glazebrook was seen neither laughing nor singing. 





«e->-'. 



A maiden never bold, 

Of spirit so still and quiet that her motion 

Blushed at herself. — S. Bailey. 

I loathe that low vice, curiosity. — R. Bernhardt. 

We keep the day with festal cheer ( ?) 
With hooks and music. — St. Mary's Girls. 

Yet a little sleep, a little slumber. — S. Cr'dz. 

I am sure care's an enemy to life. — M. Herbert. 

The bed has become a place of luxury to me ! 

I would not exchange it for all the thrones in the world. 

— M. Smith. 

Oh, that this too, too solid flesh would melt! — . i. Spruill. 



I never with important air 

In conversation overbear. — M. Villepigue. 

There is nothing original in ns, 

Except original sin. — Senior History Class. 

These are the times that try men's sonls. 

— Examination Week. 
Two Lovely berries moulded on one stem. 

— Josephine Boiren and Gertrude Stickney. 
Neat, not gaudy. — Emmie Dreirry. 

Half canonized by all that looked on her, 

So gracious was her taet and tenderness. — Mrs. I) a Base. 

I know my words are wild. — Evelyn Weeks. 

Does not rest, does not tire. — The Bell. 

With just enough of learning to misquote. 

— /. Brumby and K. Coleman. 

My tongue within my lips I rein, 

For who talks much must talk in vain. — F. Broadfoot. 

At the approach of a debate, they did neigh like horses. 

— Members of the Literary Societies. 

In love we are all fools alike. — M. Tilton. 

Her hair, 
A golden mesh to ensnare the hearts of men. — Senah Critz. 

I never was no singin' book, and never meant to be. 

— M. E. George. 

My mind is my kingdom. — A. Clark. 

Songs that draw the iron tears from Pluto's cheeks. 

— F. Williams. 



Tin m liast 

The fatal gift of beauty. — L. II. Weaver. 

A skirmish of wit between them. 

— The Inter-Society Debates. 
Certainly this is a duty, not a sin, 
" Cleanliness is indeed after godliness." 

— Girls on Second Floor. 
Flattery, formerly a vice, has now become a fashion. 

— .1/. Hughson. 
She delighteth in multiplying worlds. — I. Evans. 
Cheerful at morn she wakes from short repose, 
Breathes the keen air and carols as she goes. 

— V. Glazebrooh. 
When shall we three meet again '. 

—F. Williams, K. Glazebrook, M. Beebe. 
Hut O, she dances such a way ! 
No sun upon an Easter day 

Is half so fine a sight. — M. Dixon. 
Like breaking home ties to part from a mirror. — . I . Lamb, 
We grumble a little now and then, 

To be sure.— F. Buff. A. Sloane, II. Huff. 
Like mice beneath her petticoat, 
Her little feet stole in and out. — Georgette Holmes. 

Kisses — 

Love's great artillery. — ('. Thomas. 

She was in logic a great critic. — E. Gibson. 
Xever less alone than when alone. — E. Means. 
Wretched nn-idea'd girls. — The Editors. 



Editors 



AnN KlMUKKLY GlFFORD : '](] itui'-l ll-C'll Iff. 

Isabel Asiiiiv Bkumby Business Manager. 

Cornelia Coleman Literary Editor. 

Lucy. Taylor Redwood Editor on . I dvertisements. 

Mildred Draxsfield Tilton Irt Editor. 

Eliza Richards Brown Issistant Editor on Advertisements. 

Maejoeie Hughsox Assistant Literary Editor. 

Minnie Greexougii Buegwyn Assistant Easiness Manager. 




: .■ , .... :■■! Redwood 



Arm Kii.'' 



I 

i H Ighs ID 



.- ;hb: B '..'■! ■■.-. 



Mildred I 'r I d I 
Minnie Greenoi I ir ■■ \ 



Edit' 

Kim ri.v Gii'i-'onu 

v .1! !' Bjil'MIJY 

('(Hi I ■ ■■ • 

! • ■ . 1'AYj.oii Redwood 

,\1 [I.DKISD I >K.\XS) : I I' T) i. I " " 

Et. i/A Ki I aowN ■ . . • 

M I rtJB.iji I i i G i; SCO 

M ] N NIJ : ■ ' I I 



fditoi i 

H\ ■ '.. ■ < Mai ug i 

'. 'term . Editor. 

. | hernial 

Editor. 

I. S'/.S'I 'Hi'' /'.'./:'''. ', in I ■(■'./ . ■ 

: ■■.•■' ' i it Edit • 

in! u ni ' Busin '■,<■■. 




Lucy Taylor Redwood. Cornelia Coleman. Mildred Dransfield Tilton. 

Ann Kimberly. Gifford. Isabel Ashby Brumby. 

Eliza Richards Brown. Marjorie Hughson. Minnie Greenough Burgwyn. 



Saint Mary's. 



When you hear of this School, as you surely will do, 
Of its feasts and its fun — and, of course, lessons, too — 
When you study the catalogue through and through — 
That's when you dream of St. Mary's. 

When you've told all your friends and relations "Good- 
bye," 
When you've been on the train till you're ready to die, 
When you're tired and dusty and wanting to cry — 
That's when you dread St. Mary's. 

With a rattle and clatter and dust in whirls, 
You find yourself in an ocean of girls, 
With long hair or short hair, in plaits or curls, 
That's when vou reach St. Mary's. 



Everyone studies in quiet nooks, 
All around you see nothing but books: 
It's " exam, week," you can tell by the looks — 
That's when you fear St. Mary's. 

But the day that is dearest to every heart, 
When you don't know why, but your eyes will smart, 
And the best of friends are forced to part — 
That's when you leave St. Mary's. 

From early youth to snowy years. 
In your daily round of laughter and tears, 
Through a whole lifetime of joys and cares — 
That's when vou love St. Mary's. 

— M. R. DuB. '05. 




FINIS 



THIS SPACE. 



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Class and Society Pins, Medals and Badges 

Ten to twenty-five per cent cheaper than 
any other house in the country. Hav- 
ing made quite a number of the above 
for the Young Ladies at the college, 
which have proven satisfactory. :: :: 

We would respectfully solicit the patronage of all the differ- 
ent classes desiring work of anj' description 

Designs cheerfully furnished and Correspondence solicited 

No. 1012 F Street Northwest, WASHINGTON, D. C. 



C. E. HARTGE 



.ArrljttPrt 



OFFICE: 

Carolina Trust Building 

Rooms 409 and 410 



Supervising Architect, 

Good Shepherd Church, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

&j&* RALEIGH, N. C. 



FINE 



ROSES, CARNATIONS 



And other cut flowers for all occasions always on 
hand. Floral Designs at short notice. Palms, 
Ferns and all kinds of pot and out-of-door bed- 
ding plants, Roses, Geraniums, Scarlet Sage, 
Chrysanthemums, Vines, etc. .-. 



H. STE1NMETZ, FLORIST 

Phone 113 k5.&3. RALEIGH, N. C. 

140 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON 

COAL, 
WOOD 

AND 

ICE 

122 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 

J. G. BALL.... 



WHOLESALE- 



GROCER 



HARGETT STREET, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



FIRE! <f- FIRE! 



DO YOU FEEL SAFE FROM FIRE? 



HAVE ANYTHING YOU WANT INSURED 



Loivest Rates 

And Best Companies Guaranteed 



Insure Your Life and Property 
ivith 



JOHN C. DREWRY 

220 FAYETTEVILLE STREET, .•*■* RALEIGH, N. C. 



Young & Hughes 



Fine 

Sanitary 

'Plumbing 

in all 

branches 

Promptly 

Done 



Estimates furnished on Steam and Hot Water 
Heating anywhere in the State. A full stock 
of up-to-date fixtures and supplies con- 
stantly on hand 



Jtjt Raleigh Telephone No. 267 «*M 
122 Favetteville Street ._•* Raleigh, North Carolina 

141 



W. H. KING 



Sole Agents for 

Huyler's Fine 
Candies.... 



Our Soda Water is 
Famous 



Everything' used in the making is 

First Quality, Pure, and we 

serve it right 



Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



DRUG CO. 



E. M. UZZELL 


6 COMPANY 




P 


B 






R 


I 






I 


N 






N 


D 






T AND E 






E 


R 






R 


S 






S 


s* 




RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


Corner Wilmington and Martin Streets 



13 he 

CITIZENS NATIONAL 

BANK 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, 

Surplus and Profits, 

Deposits, 



$100,000.00 

95,000.00 

825,000.00 



Prompt and Careful Attention given to all Matters 
Entrusted to Us 



Correspondence and Personal Calls Invited 



HENRY E. LITCHFORD, Cashier 



JOS. G. BROWN, President 



RICHARD A. McCURDY, Pres. HARRIS R. WILLCOX, Mgr. 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

MORE THAN 401 MILLION DOLLARS 

'The Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Of NEW YORK 

has the gratification of announcing to its policy holders with the 
close of the sixty-first year of its corporate existence its assets 
exceed the sum of Four Hundred and One Million DoUarsj-^^iS? 
fl The magnitude and the importance of this great fiduciary fund, 
held exclusively for the protection of its beneficiaries, mainly the 
future widows and orphans of its members, call for employment 
of every safeguard possible under human contingencies :: :: :: :: 
* Under the oversight of the trustees and administration of the 
officials and their predecessors, the name of this Company has 
become a synonym for probity and strength, its assets has grown 
to be many millions greater than the assets of any other life insur- 
ance company in existence, and it has returned to its policy 
holders over 620 million dollars, accumulated for their benefit, 
being over one hundred and ninety million of dollars more than 
any other company of its kind has ever similarly disbursed :: :: 
tf It is believed that these unparalleled results afford ample 
guarantee of the future :: :: :; :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 

401 Million Dollars Belong to 
The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York 



H. E. BIGGS, District Superintendent, 

HALEKill, X. C. 



A Toilet Department that is Complete 

In the whole south you can not find a nicer 
or better selected stock of Toilet Articles 
and preparations than ours ,*, 

BOBBITT-WYNNE DRUG COMPANY 

THE DRUG STORK BY DAY, BY NTOHT 



A Fine Line of 



Ladies p a tent Kid 
Oxford Ties 



"The Shiny Kid " Only #2.00 a Pair 

HELLER BROTHERS 



W. B. GRIMES 



W. W. VAS 



GRIMES & VASS 

Bonds, Stocks and Investments 
FIRE INSURANCE 



126 Fayetteville Street 

i« 



I'hone 415 



BETTER 



GOODS 

For the Money or Same Goods 

for less Money than Elsewhere 

KING'S GROCERY 

508 Hillsboro Street. ^ Raleigh. North Carolina 



California Fruit Store 

Dealer in 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, 
Candies, Cigars and Tobacco 

Manufacturer of Pure Ice Cream 

GUS VURNAKES (SX CO.. Prop. 



Three Phones v V *• 



133 Fayetteville Street 



G. W. MARSH & SON 

Wholesale 

jB Groceries, Produce and Fruit & 

( ONSKiNMENTS SOLICITED 

13 Martin Street. . . 14 Exchange Place 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



^ANTICEPHALALGINEs, 



The Wonderful 
Headache Cure 



25 and 50 Cents at 
all Druggists 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



Manufactured by 



JAMES I. JOHNSON 



J. L. O'QUINN & COMPANY 

•F v^ W 

Mail and telegraph orders promptly filled Phones 149 

Carnations a Specialty 
POT AND BEDDING PLANTS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, AjSL&AAA NORTH CAROLINA 

TKe Singer Manufacturing Co. 

s.j^ THE VALUE OF REPUTATION •us.ju 

A reputation based on half a century's experience, dealing 
direct^' with the women of the family all over the world, is 
unique, and stimulates a worthy pride. The Singer Manu- 
facturing Company aims to maintain its well-earned reputa- 
tion for fair dealing during all time. It is permanent, its 
stores are in every city of the world, and parts and supplies 
for its machines can always be easily obtained. Sold on in- 
stallments. Old machines taken in exchange 

A. VAUGHN, Manager 

Over a Million Sold Ijiist Year KAX/EIGH, X. ('. 

145 



JOLLY & WYNNE 
JEWELRY CO. 



silvf.r notkltip:s 



HOLIDAY GOODS 



Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silverware, Spectacles 

and Eyeglasses. Repairing Fine Watches, 

.-. Jewelry and Silverware a Specialty .-. .-. 



128 FaybttevilleSt, RALEIGH. N. C. 



R. E. GIERSCH. 



Urstaxtranl 



FOR LADIKS AND GENTLEMEN 



'2I<> FAYETTEVILLE ST. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
& COME ANY 



M. ROSENTHAL 
D. ELIAS 



Iffamthj flkorrrtpg 



Foreign and Domestic Wines, Liquors 
and Cordials for family Use. Imported 
and Domestic Cigars :: :: 

We Solicit your patronage and perfect 
satisfaction is guaranteed 



Cor. Favetteville and Hargett Sts. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



T. W. BLAKE 



Jefoplpr 



FINE WATCH AND SIIA'ER REPAIRING 
A SPECIALTY 



EAST WIDE KA YETTEVIl.I.E STREET 

RALEIGH, ^s ^ ^s NORTH CAROLINA 



Fine Millinery... 



High-Class Goods and Very- 
Latest Novelties at all times 

WALTER WOOLLCOTT 

14 East Martin Street, Raleigh, North Carolina 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

s, Druggist s* 

Corner Ilillsboro and Salisbury Streets 

RALEIGH, ®0®& NORTH CAROLINA 

DARNELLS.... 



...ptjotngraplj dallrru. 

PAY HIM A VISIT _ 



CROSS e LINEHAN CO. 

..(Hlottjirra.. 



Tv"¥"¥n 



GENTS' FURNISHERS AND HATTERS 



Dr. JOEL WHITAKER 



inttt0t 



RALEIGH, & & & 



NORTH CAROLINA 



J. A. JONES 

Dealer in.... Successor to Jones & Powell 

Grain Feed, Shingles, Lath./- 
and Lumber 

Warehouse and Yard, West Union Depot 

....ORDERS SOLICITED.... 

Office, 107 Fayetteville Street RALEIGH. N. C. 

147 



THE J. D. RJGGAN CO. 



^© 



Candy, 
Toys, 
Dolls, 

Chinaware, 
Brie- a -Brae 



132 Fayetteville Street 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON 

Dealers in Higrh-Grade 

Staple and Fancy Phone 28 

GROCERIES 



Everything the Best of its Kind 



Fruits, Vegetables and Country 
Produce at Wholesale 

16 Hargett Street 



United States Depositary 

The First National Bank 

of Weldon, North Carolina 

Capita), $ 25,000.00 

Surplus, 4,000.00 

Deposits, 220,000.00 

The First National Bank of Weldon 

is the First and Only Depository of United 

States Funds in this Section of Eastern North 

Carolina 

Officers : 

Wm. H. S. BURGWYN, Pres. S. F. PATTERSON, Vice-Pres. 
J. T. GOOCH, Cashier 

RIGGSBEE — 

The Operater and Manager 
at the 

Watson & Co's Gallery 

Does Work that Pleases the 
People 

TRY HIM 



H. SILVERTHORN CO. 



Manufacturing 
Jewelers 



School Medals, Class Pins and 

Emblem Goods of All Kinds jt 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES 
AND SILVERWARE 



At Lowest Cash Prices 

917 Main Street 
LYNCHBURG, jtj* VIRGINIA 




J/WtfJ&M 


rJs the product 
ofSood Wonk= 
manship and 
the hest ^Ca= 
teria/s 


aCatfidv 





Madam Martin 
Swell... 

and Exclusive 
Styles... 



STURGIS & MARTIN 



Millinery Parlors 



121 Fayetteville Street 



RALEIGH. NOJ1TII GAB01HTA 



We Carry the Largest and 
Best Selected Stock of— ^ 



» FURNITURE ;_» 

Mattings, Rugs, Stoves, Etc. 

Prepared to Furnish Your House from Parlor to 
Kitchen 

Terms to Suit Customers ^^ 

G. S. TUCKER <& CO. 

STORES : 
RALEIGH. WILSON AND ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. 

150 



WEATHERS & UTLEY 



Dealers in 



Picture Frames, Artists' Materials, Window 
Shades and Wall Paper 



Ss S« &s Sr 



Curtain Poles, Pictures, Etc. 



John T. Pulles, President J. O. Litchford, Cashier 

Report of the Condition of Cbe Raleigh Savings Hank, at the 

Close of Business march 28. 1904 

Resources Liabilities 



Loans and discounts 8450,895.82 

Overdrafts 25.93 

Demand loans 5,748.17 

Bonds at par 65,550.00 

Stocks at par 4,00000 

Bank'g house and furn 12,800.00 

Other real estate 3,800.00 

Cash and due from Banks 100,097.42 
Cash items 2,881.24 



8845,798,38 



Capital stock % 15.000.00 

Surplus fund 15,000.00 

Accrued interest for depo. 10,000.00 
Undivided profits less ex.- 9,(339.37 
Deposits...- 599,159.21 



I, J. O. Litchford, Cashier of the Raleigh Savings Bank, do solemnly 
swear that the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and 
belief. J. O. LITCHFORD, Cashier. 

State of North Carolina— Wake County. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 2d day of April, 1904. 

P. H. BKIGGS, Notary Public. 
Correct Attest:— John T. Pullen, J. P. Ferrall, N. \V. '.Vest, T. B. Womack, 
Directors. 



THE STANDARD GAS & ELECTRIC CO. 




THE GAS STOVE 
Saves lime, labor, worry and money. 



LIGHT! 



Invites you to call at their office and 
inspect their line of Gas Stoves 

jkGet your Gas Stove now and be happyjfe 

THE STANDARD GAS & ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

124 Fayetteville Street 



The Welsbach Light is the nearest 
approach to natural light yet discovered. 
Theiefore it is best for you to use. :: :: 





Ever ready and on time. Your meals will 
never be late if you use a Gas Stove. 



LIGHT! 



Best of light is gas light. It is the light- 
est light. Lightest on your Derves, light- 
est on your eyesight, lightest on your 
pocket-book, lightest in the sense of giv- 
ing the most light. :: :: :: :: :: :: 



IF YOU WOULD SAVE YOUR EYES AND HELP YOUR BANK ACCOUNT, USE THE 



.Welsbach Light, 



T. C. POWELL 



COAL 

AND 

WOOD 



107 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

FORMERLY OCCUPIED BY JONES & POWELL 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALUMET TEA 

AND 

COFFEE CO. 






51 and 53 FRANKLIN STREET 
CHICAGO 



WM. P. ROSE 

architect 



RALEIGH. •*-■*-■*-■*- 



NORTH CAROLINA 



NEW YORK 

General Agency. 309 Tucker Building, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Executes Bonds of Guardians, Executors, Administrators and all 

other Court and Contract Bonds 



JOHN S. PESCUD & y °- ia " 



est Hargett St. 



prescription Druggist 



Terms Cashr 



Prescriptions a Specialty 



Dr. V. E. TURNER 

...Dentist... 



RALEIGH, ; 



NORTH CAROLINA 



W. B. MANN 
WM !SMS8 Grocer 



Phone lOl 



No. 5 E. Harnett St. 



mail Orders Promptly Filled at 



B. W. UPCHURCH'S 
CASH GROCERY 

Nothing but the best goods sold at prices that have no equal 



R. T. & R. L. GRAY 

& Attorneys at Law & 



Carolina Trust Bulletins 



Raleigh. North Carolina 



LEE <& BROUGHTON 

Clothiers and Gents' Furnishers 

209 Fayetteville Street 

MISSES REESE 6 COMPANY 

The Place tobuj MILLINERY 

10 West Hargett Street, ^e R-alelgh. North Carolina 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY 

Domestic or Gloss Finish 

Phone s 7 as Desired 2 , e Fayetteville st . 

J. K. MARSHALL. Prop. RALEIGH, N. C. 

Terms Cash. Inter- Q r\ ARTHUR Stall 14, City Market 

Phones Nos. 2.55 RALEIGH, N. C 

Commission flDercbant 

and Dealer in Fresh Fish, Oysters and Game 



124 v .', Fayetteville Street, 

"R-ALEIQH, N, C. 



JNO. P. HAYES. 

Photographer 

Up-to-date in style and C/J/ / L of all styles and prices from 

finish, at 20th century * nolognapns 24 for25ct. to SG.00 per ; 2 doz. 



Raleigh's Only Department Store 



St. Mary's Steel Die Stationery £i&gi& 



St, Mary's School Souvenir Postal Cards 



Largest Millinery and Ladies 
Ready-to-Wear Department in the State 



Modern Store 
Service and 
Equipment 




Trust-worthy goods only, at uniformly right prices 

All articles guaranteed as represented 

One price to all and that the lowest 

Money refunded to all dissatisfied buyers 

Courteous treatment to all 

Experienced salespeople in every Department 

Buying in large quantities and direct, saves for you the middleman's profit 



YOU'LL FIND THE STORE AS GOOD AS ADVERTISED 




J. J. THOMAS, President 
B. S. JERMAN, Cashier 



A. A. THOMPSON, Vice-President 
H, JV. JACKSON, Ass't Cashier 



REPORT TO THE NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATION 
COMMISSION SHOWING THE CONDITION OF 

®lje (Etrntme rrial mxh iFarmers lank 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 
At the Close of Business January 22, 190-4 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts _ $ 400,754.21 

Overdrafts 3,681.14 

Bonds owned 30,695.06 

Banking house and furniture 18,702.48 

Other real estate owned 13,358.31 

Demand loans on cotton S 11:1,675.42 

Cash due from banks 167,650.73 

Currency, gold aud silver 75,930.88 

357, 257. 03 

Total resources S 824,448.23 

LIABILITIES 

Capitiil stock paid in September 30,1891 $ 100,000.00 

Surplus and profits earned 57.197.88 

DEPOSITS 

Individual deposits $ 639,571.92 

Bank deposits 25,388 22 

Cashier's Checks 1,878.26 

Certified Checks __- 412.00 

667,250.40 

Total liabilities. S 824,448.23 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA— County of Wakk 

I, B. S. Jeeman, Cashier of the Commercial and Farmers Bank, do 
solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief. B. S. Jerman, Cashier. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me, this22d day of January, A. D. 1904. 

E. B. Crow, Notary Public. 
Correct— Attest: 

Directors : 
J. J. Thomas R. B. Raney 

Thomas H. Briggs Joshua B. Hill 

Carey J. Hunter 

Safe Deposit Boxes For Rent No Interest Paid on Deposits 



>atnt ilan} ^rijnnl 



RALEIGH, * £> £ NORTH CAROLINA 



iFor (Stria and foitng Umttt-n 



THK DIOCESAN SCHOOL FOR 
THE CAROLINAS 

63rn Annual ^psatnn ©urns grntrntbrr 15, 1904 

ST. MARY'S OFFERS INSTRUCTIONS 

IN" 

1. uH|f (EnllMjf 3. JUIif iSitaiiiraa frliaal 

2. Slit iHitsir g>rl)0ol 4. She Art grhnnl 

5. Slif {trrparatari} *rljnol 

IN 1903-'0J., 245 STUDENTS FROM 17 DIOCESES 
23 IN THK FACULTY 

Special Attention to the Social and Christian side of Educa- 
tion without slight to Scholastic Training 



For Catalogue Address 
Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE, B.S., B.D., Rector 

155 



J. A. MILLS. President LEO. J>. HEAUTT, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HAVES. Cashier 



Carolina Trust Co. 



TRANSACTS A GENERAL 
BANKING BUSINESS 



CAPITAL 



$100,000 



Acts as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, 

Trustee, Assignee, Receiver, Broker, 

Agent 

Financial Agent for the Floating of Stocks and 

Bonds of Municipal, Railroad, Cotton 

Mills and other Corporations 



PAYS INTEREST ON TIME DEPOSITS 



RALEIGH, 

156 



NORTH CAROLINA 



FUQUAY SPRINGS 



ON 



Raleigh & Cape Fear 
Railroad 



Is a Most Delightful Place for those seeking 
health and rest 



ONLY ONE HOUR'S RIDE FROM RALEIGH 



The Water is famous for its cures of Dyspepsia 
and Rheumatism 



CHAS. II. BELVIX, President 



F. II. BRIGGS, Cashier 



THE 

NATIONAL 

BANK 



OF RALEIGH 



Capital, = = = = = = = = = $225,000 

Surplus and Profits, = = = = = 100,000 



Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent in 
Fire and Burglar=Proof Vault 



RALEIGH, £££i NORTH CAROLINA 





Just Enough Pepsin to Tone Up the Stomach 
Just Enough Celery to Tone Up the Nerves 

At All Soda Fountains 5 Cents 




J. R. HOLDER 



Civery 




Board and Exchange Stables 

Carriages, Horses and Buggies for hire 
at all hours of the day and night. :: :: 



Salisbury Street, rear Post-Office. 

158 



All 'Phones No. Si. 



A. B. STRONACH CO. 

DRY GOODS, READY-TO-WEAR GAR- 
MENTS and HA TS, SHOES 
and NOTIONS. 

t^* i^* ^% (p* 

The best selections at the lowest possible 
margin of profit. $ Polite and prompt 
attention and service. <[ To allow no 
misrepresentation and where there is just 
cause for dissatisfaction to refund the 
money. 

A. B. STRONACH CONFANY, 



Fayetteville to Wilmington Sts. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



CROWELL'S 
DRUG STORE 




..Ibard to ffieat.. 

We have beard our 
customers say they 
never drank better 
soda than ours, and 
we are proud of this 
appreciation, because 
we take special pains 
to make the best that 
can be made. We use 
only pure frui t fla- 
vors, and westudy up 
new novelties, such 
as our Peach Punch, 
Cerise Frappe, Zero 
Freeze. :: :: :: :: 



...AGENTS FOR... 



WHITMAN'S CANDIES 

80 CENTS PER POUND 



..THE.. 



W. W. MILLS COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE 

LUMBER DEALERS 

Offices: CAROLINA TRUST BUILDING 



^ 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 

159 



CAPITAL $100,000.00 



THE 
COTTRELL 



* 



REAL ESTATE 
* INSURANCE 

AND.... 

LOAN COMPANY 



GENERAL REAL ESTATE AND 
INSURA NCE A GENTS 



City and Farm Property in all sections of Virginia for Sale and Exchange. 

• Several old Colonial homes for sale. ■ Special attention given to placing 
money on First Mortgages. Over $700,000.00 placed in the last ten ( 10) years. 

• Fire, Life and Accident Insurance written. Rents collected. ■ Each 
department is under the personal supervision of a capable manager. :: :: 

2700 Washington Ave., - - - - NEWPORT NEWS, VA 



BOYLAN, PEAPXE & COMPANY 


i 

'*. 

Dress Goods, Millinery 

Wraps. Trimmings, 
«(«!(« Gloves, Hosiery, 
***** Handkerchiefs 

Mail Orders Filled Intelligently and 
Promptly 


& Tailored Costumes 

Underwear, S* In >w 
Notions a.nd ** ** 
Fancy Goods 

206-8 Fayetteville Street 
203-5 Salisbury Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 





E. B. BAIiBEE 



<•. 15. UARBBE 



MEMBERS NEW YORK 
COTTON EXCHANGE 



BARBEE & COMPANY 

Commission 
Merchants 

Cotton, Stocks, Grain, Provisions 



Private Wire to New York Orders for Future Delivery 
and Chicago Promptly Executed 



RALEIGH, JJjtj*.,* 

162 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Robbins Livery Stable 



Carriages of Every Kind at 
Every Hour for Everything 



Drive in 
a 



Rubber-Tired Carriage 



Phone 79 



From the Right 
Place 



LOW PRICES 
FINE TURNOUTS 



Promptness and Courtesy Paid to all Orders 



JAS. H. "ROBBINS 

RALEIGH, jj^Jjt NORTH CAROLINA 



DOBBIN & 
FEBBALL 






Sellers of the Best 






123 and 125 Fayetteville St. 
RALEIGH, N.C. 



Dry 
Goods 



of All 
Kinds 



arpets, 

Curtains 

SHOES 



Our Special Free Delioery 
Mail Order System is at 
your service. We prepay 
express or freight charges 
anywhere in North Caro- 
lina on all cash mail 
orders of $5.00 or more. 
We will gladly mail 
samples of Dress Goods, 
Silks, White Goods or any- 
thing that may he sampled. 



Write or Telephone Us 



DOBBIN & FERRALL 



A Graceful Carriage 



Distinguishes every Lady 
who wears Hunter Bros. 
&. Brewer's 




Because they fit, Are well 
made, Nicely finished 
inside, and are so grace- 
fully and elegantly shaped 
it excites a sense of pride 
in their wearer 



HUNTER BROTHERS & BREWER 



210 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 

163 



W. C. STRONACH'S SONS 
COMPANY 

GROCERS 



215 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Thos. H. Briggs & Sons 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HARDWARE 



Of Any Description 



Cutlery, 

Bicycles, 

House Furnishing 

Goods 



Ranges, Cooking and Heating 
Stoves 



B. H. BATTLE, President ALEXANDER WEBB, Vice- Presides 

CHAS. ROOT, Secretary and Treasurer 



TRe North Carolina 

Home Insurance 
Company 



Established 1868.. 



OF RALEIGH, N. C. 



Insure your property against fire and lighting in 
this Company, It is a home institution seeking 
home patronage. It has been successful in busi- 
ness for more than tbirty-four years. It is safe, 
solid, reliable and worthy of confidence. Iu 
patronizing it you help build up North Carolina 



Gives Protection against Loss by Fire and Lightning 
Over $1,000,000 Losses Paid in North Carolina &&& 



Agents Wanted in Unoccupied Territory 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



WATCHES AND 
JEWELRY 



STERLI/NG SILVERWARE 



CLOCKS 
DIAriO/MDS 



226 FATETTEVILLE ST. 

166 



RflLElQH, N. C. 



DUGHrS RESTAURANT 



ERUIT AMD 
CONFECTIONERY 



OYSTER AND ICE CREAM PARLOR 



CATERER FOR WEDDINGS. PARTIES. ETC. 

FURNISH CHINA. SILVERWARE. 

LINEN. ETC. 



ALL 'PHONES 123 RALEIGH, N. C. 



RICHMOND MEAT MARKET RICHMOND MEAT MARKET 



J. SCHWARTZ 



Dealer in 



(Etjoto Mmtz 

SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 



P. O. Box 342 



«M City Market 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



A. C. HINTON 

Merchant 
Tailoring 



Office . 
Carolina Trust Building: 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



JOSHUA B. HILT, 



J. K. FEKEAL1 



TELEPHONE , 



J. % FERRALL & COMPANY 
Grocers i^ 

All the Nice Cakes, Crackers, Pickles, Etc. 

222 Fayetteville Street 
RALEIGH, ^j«^jt NORTH CAROLINA 



Choice Selections 



Prices and Cuts on Application 



ife 



Arttsttr ifetttturr 



is like paintings by old masters, 
or like rare lace. It never loses 
its value and it never goes out of 
fashion. The a'Sthetically beau- 
tiful, the really artistic produc- 
tions of the cabinet maker are a 
continuous and lasting delight 
to lis possessore. Why invest in 
things which are commonplace 
and which soon become a con- 
stant source of displeasure, when 
for the same outlay you can 
obtain really artistic furniture 



WE WILL TELL YOU HOW TO GO ABOUT IT 

Visit our warerooms and you will be delighted with our pro- 
ductions and astonished at the low prices we ask for them, 

ftoyall & Borden Turniture Co. 



Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts. 
168 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



We sell 
Everything 




SHprih Star 
Refrigerators 
Ice Cream 
Freezers 



Cook Stoves, Ranges, Heating Stoves 
for wood or coal, Furnaces, Paint for 
houses, Stains for floors, Enamels for 
bath tubs, Hard Oils for floors, Johnson 
Floor Wax. Floor Restorers, Screen 
Doors and Windows, Poultry Netting, 
Scissors, Razors, Knives and Forks, 
Carvers, 

SNlail Orders Solicited 
SMoney Back if not Sailed 

Hart-Ward Hardware Company 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Perry & Rosenthal 



All- 
Latest 

Styles 



m 



♦♦♦Oxfords 



Just 
Received 



Call and give us a 
trial 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL 



GATCHEL 

& 

MANNING 

ILLUSTRATORS 

DESIGNERS 

AND 

ENGRAVERS 



PHILADELPHIA. 
Pennsylvania 



THE ILLUSTRATIONS HEREIN 
DEMONSTRATE OUR ABILITY 



BEN. N. WALTERS 
& COMPANY 

.../K<ii>p and Taney Groceries 



Cor. .Tones and Harrington Streets. 



RALEIGH, JT. C. 



wins publication hras tururn nut 

from tlir 

Printing tatablisljnmtt 
of 

iEfchmrfca $c Unmgljhm 

ffialfiglj. N. 01. 



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Hljrit in nrru nf Printing nr Binding, 

if gmt toant it firat-rlasa ann taant 

it quirk srnii tlitm unur nrorr 




WK&4